#2
What do you want to use it for?

The only place I would see using this is in a setting like mega-church gigs, where I want to raise my volume to a workable level, but not blast the first few rows

Edit: I would definitely put a mic inside the shield. Though it might sound interesting/far away if you did it the other way. There is no "right" way to record
Last edited by denied at May 30, 2010,
#4
for studio use, this would be better: http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Randall-Isolation-12-Speaker-Cab?sku=480371

for outside, ya, just build your own.
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Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#5
you wouldn't be able to crank the amp....
sound travels in other directions then just forward.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#6
Quote by denied
What do you want to use it for?

The only place I would see using this is in a setting like mega-church gigs, where I want to raise my volume to a workable level, but not blast the first few rows

Edit: I would definitely put a mic inside the shield. Though it might sound interesting/far away if you did it the other way. There is no "right" way to record


Yeah I totally agree with that, what I meant was for the cleanest, directest sound. Believe me, I like to experiment!
#7
If your home studio does not have a separate recording room, I could see it being semi-useful. Depends on what you need.

Every time I've taken a gig at a church, the drummer is behind one of these.

Quote by Acousticmirror
you wouldn't be able to crank the amp.... sound travels in other directions then just forward.


Yes but it does sound less harsh when it has to get past a plexi wall

For actual isolation you need an isolation box, but I'm a little suspicious of those, never tried one.
Last edited by denied at May 30, 2010,
#8
Quote by AcousticMirror
you wouldn't be able to crank the amp....
sound travels in other directions then just forward.


Of course it does, but the majority of the sound comes from the front of the speaker. That's why you don't normally mic the side of your amp.
#9
Quote by whatadrag
Of course it does, but the majority of the sound comes from the front of the speaker. That's why you don't normally mic the side of your amp.


Bass is omni directional. Do you just want a focused sound or do you want to be able to play your amp louder then you normally would. It would help you record. It would not allow you to play your amp any louder. All that would happen is that the majority of the soundwaves would hit the board and bounce back and into your neighbor's house.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#10
Quote by denied
If your home studio does not have a separate recording room, I could see it being semi-useful. Depends on what you need.

Every time I've taken a gig at a church, the drummer is behind one of these.



Yeah I was thinking of building a bigger one for the drums as well.

And by "home studio" I mean I have a bunch of instruments, mics, and a computer in one room.
#11
Quote by AcousticMirror
Bass is omni directional. Do you just want a focused sound or do you want to be able to play your amp louder then you normally would. It would help you record. It would not allow you to play your amp any louder. All that would happen is that the majority of the soundwaves would hit the board and bounce back and into your neighbor's house.



Actually you just gave me an idea. I'm thinking instead of building an isolation wall, I make a plexiglas cage around the amp.
#13
no, I would be doing it for the sake of isolating and "boxing in" the sound of my amp. One of my neighbors just died, one moved, and the other plays guitar, too so there's not much reason to turn down my amp other than the fact that I'm in the same room with it.