#1
So basically my mother cleaned my fretboard yesterday with Boots cucumber facial wipes - a really weird thing to use. But she doesn't seem to believe me that not using the correct cleaning solution could damage the neck.

Can someone please clear this up?
Cheers.
#2
well ur fretboard will smell nice lol

but facial wipes are meant for skin, not wood

it could damage any finish you have on the fretboard.
#4
Try Dunlop's Formula 65 kit...
"Play them blues, boy!"

Gear:
Peavey 6505+ head
Mesa 2x12
ESP Ltd EC 1000
Jackson King V
Jackson DKMG
Peavey Classic 30
Ibanez TS9
BOSS EQ 7
#5
Quote by Rajah
Why would your Mum clean your guitar?


Yes, why? She should have instructions not to touch it.
#6
Use nothing but a microfibre cloth and elbow grease. For tricky bits I've heard a new toothbrush is good to get into little crevices. Don't waste your money on these cleaning products.

If it's a rosewood fretboard and becomes dry, then put a small amount of lemon oil (not actual oil from lemons). This needs to be done very rarely (every few years).
#8
If your guitar has a maple fretboard, the worst those wipes could do is stain the finish and cause the fretwire to rust slightly sooner (it'll still take years). Depending on the nature of the cloth, small pieces of fibre coudl get stuck in the nut, under frets or around the strings, which can cause severe tuning problems.
If your guitar has a rosewood or ebony fretboard (or any other fretboard which doesn't have a hard finish), it could cause a lot more damage. Introducing random chemicals and liquids to a fretboard like that can cause all sorts of problems; discolouring the wood, drying out the wood (very likely with any kind of facial wipe), sprung frets (can require anything from ten minutes with a hammer to a full refret to fix), cracked binding, shifted nuts, raised inlays, all sorts.


There are only two maintenance products that should ever touch your fretboard, or in fact any part of your guitar. The first is an inkless, completely dry, microfibre cloth. The same ones photographers use to clean their lenses; opticians will also sell them. These are the only thing you should ever need to clean the guitar. Use soft, smooth circular motions and never scrub or apply much pressure. If an rea is proving particularly hard to clean simply wipe over it again and again until eventually the dirt wears down and shifts - never scrub at it. The only other product you should ever use is lemon oil (or a synthetic oil of your choice produced for the same purpose - your local guitar stores will have various products to choose from. Do not use any other kinds of oil). Lemon oil is used to restore a dried out rosewood fretboard. You know when a rosewood fretboard has dried out because it starts to lose its colour and it will begin to feel rough when sliding your fingers side to side over the fretboard as well as up and down. Even if your fretboard is low quality rosewood and you leave it near a strong heat source for a long time, it will still take a year or more to dry out. With regular playing and storing the guitar in a sensible place, you shouldn't need to apply lemon oil any more than once every two years. Even then, you only use a tiny amount - you're just restoring the fretboard, you're not trying to drown it. Two or three drops is the most you'll need for a whole fretboard. Wipe it on using a microfibre cloth, again in soft circular motions, and try to stay awar ftom the fretwire itself, the nut and any binding your guitar's neck may have.
Lower quality ebony fretboards can sometimes need light oiling too every so often, but it's even rare than with rosewood. Some people think that unfinished fretboards need constant oiling and they load up their necks with chemicals all the time. Do not do this. It causes a lot of damage to the neck. If in doubt, remember: you can always add more, but you can't take any away.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#9
I have been cleaning my guitar with used up guitar picks(to scrape off the grime), a soft peice of dry cloth(like you know the glasses wiping type). Here's the process:
1) I carefully scrape off the grime with a used pick.
2) I wipe the fretboard with a dry cloth.
3) I blow all the sh*t off the fretboard. Strum some chords.
repeat steps 2 and 3 until fretboard is is totally clean.
#10
Quote by Grimriffer
I have been cleaning my guitar with used up guitar picks(to scrape off the grime), a soft peice of dry cloth(like you know the glasses wiping type). Here's the process:
1) I carefully scrape off the grime with a used pick.
2) I wipe the fretboard with a dry cloth.
3) I blow all the sh*t off the fretboard. Strum some chords.
repeat steps 2 and 3 until fretboard is is totally clean.


yaa thiss
but i would use some kinda home appliances cleaner
#11
Quote by Grimriffer
I have been cleaning my guitar with used up guitar picks(to scrape off the grime), a soft peice of dry cloth(like you know the glasses wiping type). Here's the process:
1) I carefully scrape off the grime with a used pick.
2) I wipe the fretboard with a dry cloth.
3) I blow all the sh*t off the fretboard. Strum some chords.
repeat steps 2 and 3 until fretboard is is totally clean.
Enjoy your gunked up fretwire and nut.

Quote by kian89
yaa thiss
but i would use some kinda home appliances cleaner
Enjoy your dried out fretboard, sprung frets and cracked inlays.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#12
Quote by MrFlibble
Enjoy your gunked up fretwire and nut.

Enjoy your dried out fretboard, sprung frets and cracked inlays.


Then what ???
#13
Then do what any person with a working brain would do and don't use anything that isn't specifically design for guitar maintenance - even then most of the products on the market aren't actually good for the guitar and you're almost always better off using nothing more than a dry microfibre cloth and some elbow grease.

Either that or have fun writing off your guitar.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#14
Quote by Deltast0rm
So basically my mother cleaned my fretboard yesterday with Boots cucumber facial wipes - a really weird thing to use. But she doesn't seem to believe me that not using the correct cleaning solution could damage the neck.

Can someone please clear this up?
Cheers.



take one of your mom's cucumber wipes and start cleaning her unfinished dining room table with it.


then take a rough cloth and scrub your dad's car.

see how well that goes over.

rosewood boards are unfinished and like said, you should not introduce chemicals, grease or materials that will rot on the board, and possibly damage the frets or board color.

instead, like said, use the VERY INEXPENSIVE lemon oil guitar products they sell everywhere or you're a fool.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#15
Quote by Deltast0rm
So basically my mother cleaned my fretboard yesterday with Boots cucumber facial wipes - a really weird thing to use. But she doesn't seem to believe me that not using the correct cleaning solution could damage the neck.

Can someone please clear this up?
Cheers.


Moving on.....