#1
I plugged in my Mesa Boogie Single Rectifier head today, and right when I put it off standby to on, no sound came out. I thought it was my cables, so I checked the back, and I noticed that the tubes were fine, but there was a burning smell coming out of the back of the head. what could be wrong? fuse blown or anything? Thanks.
#2
Hey!
Usually if a fuse is blown, it's not possible to turn your amp on. To check the fuse you have to get it out of the amplifier and see if it is brown or black inside. If so go and buy a new one

If there is no sound coming, there are a lot of possibilities: Maybe the head isn't connected well to the cabinet.

If you have a loop function check if either send or return is turned to zero
#3
fuse doesn't smell burned when it blows.

burned smell usually comes from the transformers, maybe a capacitor, or a wire shorting and making sparks or something.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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#4
Quote by ECistheBest
fuse doesn't smell burned when it blows.

burned smell usually comes from the transformers, maybe a capacitor, or a wire shorting and making sparks or something.



Or new amp smell ?
#5
a new amp shouldn't smell burned unless theres something wrong, or there's dust all over the tubes...
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard
#6
if the fuse IS blown (and there's a good chance of this) and you go to replace it, i'd have my hand on the standby switch the whole time after switching it on (ready to flip it back to 'standby' in case of a problem) - the smell, describe it (plastic, rubbery, -was there smoke too?)

*the smell is not coming from the fuse btw, but the fuse may have also blown in the process of whatever did happen

*sometimes this happens with a cabinet mismatch, ie too low of a load on the amp (check the speaker load matches or exceeds what the amps set at)

*sometimes a bug or spider gets inside the amp and can cause a major short (which usually fries the power board - if this is what happened then hopefully the power board is separate from the rest of the amps innards so that it can easily be replaced)

i think i'm getting into the TMI range - i'll check back in a few