#1
Hey,

So I've been having trouble with these bends. No matter what, the bend seems to harmonise badly with the other note. Here's an example, from "Run to the hills":

E|--------12-------12-------10~------
B|--------15b17--15b17--13b15~--

So, lets check I'm doing this right. I play 15 and 12 together, but only bend the 15, right?

It just sounds wrong, everytime I do it. Any ideas apart from swap hands with someone?
#2
So, lets check I'm doing this right. I play 15 and 12 together, but only bend the 15, right?

Yeah
You must bend B string to get exactly same sound that is on high E string.
#3
Only thing I can think without hearing you is you are either over bending or under bending the note.

Play the 17th fret on the B string then bend the 15th fret until you hear the same pitch as the 17th fret.

Then just add the 12th fret on the e sting and it should work.

Hope that helps.
#4
well the 12 on the e is an E. the 17 on the b string is also an e. so you should be bending the b string up to the same pitch as the e string. maybe you're just not bending far enough?
#5
there;s 2 possible mistakes:
your tuning is not accurate enough
your not bending enough or your bending 2 much
and yes u only bend the 15 and make sure to keep the 12 in its position( u may bend it a little by mistake)
#6
You are playing it right, but don't bend to the 17th, bend it until it "meets" the note on the E string.

I hope that made sense...
#7
Alright.

My tunings alright, maybe .1 out or something? Tried it on 2 guitars, and it happens on both.

I'll have another crack at it later, thanks for the help guys.
#8
Quote by Lucozade
Only thing I can think without hearing you is you are either over bending or under bending the note.

Play the 17th fret on the B string then bend the 15th fret until you hear the same pitch as the 17th fret.

Then just add the 12th fret on the e sting and it should work.

Hope that helps.

+1 This is good advice. You need to train your ear to recognize when you reach the pitch you are bending to, otherwise it will sound bad.
#9
Ok, so had a bit of a mess around with it. I've used my ear and tuner to see if I can reach an E on the B string, and it's very almost there but not quite. I'm bending the string a lot to get it, pushijng the D and G strings up with the B string.

I'm just not reaching it. I've got 9's on at the moment, and they feel close to breaking pushing them any further.

Any ideas?
#12
Just bear in mind that regardless of how well you bend Run to the hills is never going to sound quite right on a single guitar because the recording is two guitars.
Actually called Mark!

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Just bear in mind that regardless of how well you bend Run to the hills is never going to sound quite right on a single guitar because the recording is two guitars.


I sense a good excuse for me to use...

I can get it close enough to sound "right", so it's ok. I'll keep practasing though.
#14
Harmony bends are intended to make your amp scream when playing with overdrive. If you don't get it quite right, it will sound terrible. You are getting good advice above re: training your ear and using your whole wrist to bend, rather than the isolated strength of one finger.
#15
Quote by DeadlySurfer
I sense a good excuse for me to use...

I can get it close enough to sound "right", so it's ok. I'll keep practasing though.

If you record the normal notes, play them back and play the bent notes along with them on the guitar I bet it'll sound a lot better to your ears.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#16
Okay, well first of all, if you're playing a guitar with a Floating Bridge it will not sound right AT ALL.

Second of all, a way to get better at this is to play it VERY slowly and just bend the D not on the B string until it harmonizes perfectly with the E on the E string.

Just practice doing that until it sounds right.
#17
When two notes very close in pitch are played together, they produce an oscillation equal in speed to the difference in hertz between the two notes. So if you play 440Hz and 441Hz you'll hear a oscillation once per second, if you play 440Hz and 450Hz you'll hear 10 per second, etc. So if you want to bend to perfect unison, listen close to the oscillation and try to make it slow down until it disappears. This works acoustically but cranking the gain will make it even easier.
/physics lesson
#18
Quote by The Buttmonkey
Okay, well first of all, if you're playing a guitar with a Floating Bridge it will not sound right AT ALL.


It can still sound right if you know what you're doing
#19
Well, if you don't know what you're doing like this guy evidently...

Just bend the E note on the 12th fret, it's very simple.
#21
I think he gets that he has to bend it to the note guys.

If you don't think you can bend that high then either push yourself a bit and if the string breaks, then the string breaks... just don't be leaning over your guitar when you do it.

I'm currently down half step, but I bend until the B string is where the D string should be.
Quote by RU Experienced? , bass-man9712


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#22
One thing might be that you're doing perfectly but your guitar cant do unison bends.

By this I mean, do you have a guitar with a floating bridge? because with that, when you bend one string, the tension on the bridge increases and bends it towards the neck, which makes it loosen up the rest of the strings, making them go slightly flat while you hold the bend, and pretty much making it impossible to get an Unison in E, or any other note thats not slightly flat for that matter...

****ing floyd roses =(
#23
Quote by revoh
One thing might be that you're doing perfectly but your guitar cant do unison bends.

By this I mean, do you have a guitar with a floating bridge? because with that, when you bend one string, the tension on the bridge increases and bends it towards the neck, which makes it loosen up the rest of the strings, making them go slightly flat while you hold the bend, and pretty much making it impossible to get an Unison in E, or any other note thats not slightly flat for that matter...

****ing floyd roses =(
It's not at all impossible, all you have to do it bend the E string a little bit too to bring it back to pitch. Once you get used to it it's like second nature.