#1
So I made this chord progression. It resolves nicely to A, but all of it except for the first bar has G naturals in it so the best fitting Key signature would be D.
Also it's most definitely a tonal piece so it isn't A Mixolydian
(and using a D major scale sounds bad)
So it's in A since it resolves there well? (doesn't resolve to D in the slightest)

I don't have a specific question but I'm interested in knowing what's going on here.
Please help my brain with your great insight, whatever it may be
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#2
Songs don't have to fit any key signature in specific. In fact, most songs use notes that are out of key. Where the song resolves to is the key, regardless of the notes it uses to get there.

Basically what is going on in your progression is it is using b7s instead of natural 7s. This is a common substitution in major keys since it sort of "softens up" the half-step between the 7 and the 1.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
Where the song resolves to is the key, regardless of the notes it uses to get there.

This isnt true couldnt you have 100 bars in A then modulate to B for 10 resolving in B then this implies B is the key.
#4
Quote by food1010
Basically what is going on in your progression is it is using b7s instead of natural 7s. This is a common substitution in major keys since it sort of "softens up" the half-step between the 7 and the 1.


Mmm, yes. Exactly what I was looking for :3
Still have a lot to learn about common note substitutions and how they'll affect progressions.

(and to above, it modulates so it doesn't stick to a single key. It starts in A and ends in B)
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at May 31, 2010,
#5
Quote by hd7373
This isnt true couldnt you have 100 bars in A then modulate to B for 10 resolving in B then this implies B is the key.


uhhhhhhhhhhhhh no.

for the first 100 bars, the key is A. 10 more bars resolving to B doesn't imply that the previous 100 bars were also in B -- that makes no sense.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
uhhhhhhhhhhhhh no.

for the first 100 bars, the key is A. 10 more bars resolving to B doesn't imply that the previous 100 bars were also in B -- that makes no sense.
This.

The first section is in A, then the second section is in B. That's it. The song doesn't have one single key.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by FacetOfChaos
So I made this chord progression. It resolves nicely to A, but all of it except for the first bar has G naturals in it so the best fitting Key signature would be D.
Also it's most definitely a tonal piece so it isn't A Mixolydian
(and using a D major scale sounds bad)
So it's in A since it resolves there well? (doesn't resolve to D in the slightest)

I don't have a specific question but I'm interested in knowing what's going on here.
Please help my brain with your great insight, whatever it may be



can you give us your exact chord progression?

example:

 | A       |G     D | A            |G      D :|



context is important. At this point we can only assume, and thats not a good way to get a accurate answer.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 1, 2010,
#8
Quote by food1010
This.

The first section is in A, then the second section is in B. That's it. The song doesn't have one single key.

Your sentence implies what I said, that is why I used it as a counter-example
Quote by food1010
Where the song resolves to is the key, regardless of the notes it uses to get there.

I have heard others say exactly what you initially said and it is a common misconception.

Pieces can have multiple keys so the ending resolution doesnt matter as much as the relation between the chords in determining the. There can be an implied key without the need for resolution.
Last edited by hd7373 at Jun 1, 2010,
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky

context is important. At this point we can only assume, and thats not a good way to get a accurate answer.

Exactly context is the most important part in determining the key.
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
context is important.


+1,607.

Quote by hd7373
Pieces can have multiple keys so the ending resolution doesnt matter as much as the relation between the chords in determining the. There can be an implied key without the need for resolution.


right, but we're not talking about music that's tonally ambiguous. we're talking about two sections with clearly defined tonal centers. the first 100 bars have a tonal center that is A. i cite as evidence: "couldnt you have 100 bars in A". the remaining 10 bars are in B - "modulate for 10 resolving to B". for both sections, you have clearly defined your keys and tonal centers. the key is A for the first 100 bars, and the key is B for the final 10 bars.

i don't think that the ending resolution (i.e., the note(s) of the resolution at the very end of the composition) determines the key of the entire piece, if that's what you're saying.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
^mmm, take for example Mozarts sonata in Bb K333 mvt 1. It starts and ends in Bb but goes to F and a number of other keys during the piece. yet it's still called 'sonata in Bb'.
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
^mmm, take for example Mozarts sonata in Bb K333 mvt 1. It starts and ends in Bb but goes to F and a number of other keys during the piece. yet it's still called 'sonata in Bb'.


titling is a different story. i hate that, though. i'll write a sonata or something that starts in one key but moves through a few other keys (and sometimes doesn't even return to the original key) and i never have any idea of what to call it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.