#1
I was told to break down songs so i can better understand how music and theory work.

i just randomly selected a song by whitesnake called still of the night.

i am hoping i am doing this right but what i found by breaking it down is that it seems to center around an f# locrian type scale. the very first riff just seems like a simple f# minor pentatonic riff with some power chords but the rest of the song seems to use alot more of the notes from the f# locrain scale. which is just Eminor/Gmajor.

you can especially hear the use of the locrian scale in the little interlude in the middle of the song.

thats basically all i could do. am i doing this right?
#2
I've listened to the song, and it doesn't seem to be in locrian at all. I think you’ve seen that the song uses the 2nd position of the Em scale. Do you know about modes? That they are not just shapes on the fretboard but are actually a different concept all together?
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#3
Quote by rockingamer2
I've listened to the song, and it doesn't seem to be in locrian at all. I think you’ve seen that the song uses the 2nd position of the Em scale. Do you know about modes? That they are not just shapes on the fretboard but are actually a different concept all together?


ya i have read about modes. i dont understand completely when people say that they are a "different concept". i know that in order for it to be true modal music you cant have accidentals outside of the modes scale and the chords have to be extensions and whatnot to really bring out the mode. but thats all i know about modes differences with tonal music(if thats right)

but wouldnt saying that its revolving around the second position of the Em scale be sort of the same thing as saying it is using the locrian scale. i know its not truly modal and it would be labeling it incorrectly, but wouldnt that all it be is just labeling it incorrectly? its using the same notes right?
#4
It can't be modal because the songs tonality is Em. That's it. The song uses the shape, but the shape is just a way to memorize where the notes are. The shape doesn't dictate what is going on harmonically. Also, just because it uses the same notes doesn't make it lociran. Em has the same notes as G, but it still Em because that's the tonality you hear.

You can say that something has a modal feel, like "play this lick for a phrygian sound." But at the end of the day, it's still tonal.
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#5
Quote by rockingamer2
It can't be modal because the songs tonality is Em. That's it. The song uses the shape, but the shape is just a way to memorize where the notes are. The shape doesn't dictate what is going on harmonically. Also, just because it uses the same notes doesn't make it lociran. Em has the same notes as G, but it still Em because that's the tonality you hear.

You can say that something has a modal feel, like "play this lick for a phrygian sound." But at the end of the day, it's still tonal.



wouldnt you say that the tonality is minor? not E minor? the sound is minor, but its centered around F# not E.

and now i get why i shouldnt call it locrian, it doesnt even have a locrian sound to it. mind is kinda blown right now. i didnt know you could still maintain a purely minor sound, with a minor scale, but starting in a different position.
#6
Positions don't actually mean anything, all that matters is the notes you're using and what you're playing them over.

There's a lot of F# chords going on in Still of the Night but the song never feels like it "belongs" there, does it? Always feels like it's itching to go somewhere else, and it's only when everything shifts back to Em that it all feels like home again.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
Positions don't actually mean anything, all that matters is the notes you're using and what you're playing them over.

There's a lot of F# chords going on in Still of the Night but the song never feels like it "belongs" there, does it? Always feels like it's itching to go somewhere else, and it's only when everything shifts back to Em that it all feels like home again.


actually the very first riff gravitates to f# but the interlude definately goes more towards Em