#1
So im trying to connect 2 light sockets to a single power cable, but only 1 lightbulb manages to turn on, while the other doesnt.

I spliced the power cable into 4 strands: 2 positives and 2 negatives so i could distrubute the current to both light sockets. Each socket is conected to an interruptor, so i connected 1 positive and 1 negative strand from each of the socketss to one posite and 1 negative strand of the power cable. like this: (attached file)


any help?

Thanks
Attachments:
foco.jpg
#3
^Especially Spanish people that use Papyrus.
Begin again in the night, let's sway again tonight.
Your arm on my shoulder, your cheek against mine.
Where can we go, when will we find that, we know.
#4
The message in the diagram is irrelevant. I explained how it should work in English, the text in Spanish was to explain how it worked to my cousin.
#6
I believe the flow of electrons will 'pick' the path of least resistance. Do the two bulbs have different ratings?

Edit:
Quote by Dirge Humani
Is there enough current to power both bulbs?
That's what I first thought, but wouldn't both bulbs light up but only at half the normal intensity?
THE OHIO STATE BUCKEYES

Drive! Drive on down the field, men of the scarlet and gray...
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginere
Engenere
I'm good with math.

a0/2 + ∑ an cos(nπx/L) + bn sin(nπx/L)

ĤΨ(x,t) = iħ ∂Ψ(x,t)/∂t
σx σp ≥ h/2
Last edited by Got Guitar? at Jun 1, 2010,
#9
The way you described and drew it, they should both light up. Either one of the bulbs or wires is broken, or you wired it incorrectly. Also try connecting them in series (positive to the positive lead of one, then the negative lead of that bulb to the positive of the other bulb, then the negative of the second bulb to negative).

Electricity does NOT take the path of least resistance. The current splits inversely proportional to the resistances.
#10
Quote by Got Guitar?
I believe the flow of electrons will 'pick' the path of least resistance. Do the two bulbs have different ratings?

Edit:That's what I first thought, but wouldn't both bulbs light up but only at half the normal intensity?

Why did we both think the same things?
Quote by bnull24
The way you described and drew it, they should both light up. Either one of the bulbs or wires is broken, or you wired it incorrectly. Also try connecting them in series (positive to the positive lead of one, then the negative lead of that bulb to the positive of the other bulb, then the negative of the second bulb to negative).

Electricity does NOT take the path of least resistance. The current splits inversely proportional to the resistances.

If I remember correctly, wiring in series will cause less power at the second bulb.
Last edited by Dirge Humani at Jun 1, 2010,
#11
Both bulbs are the same intensity and there is enough current to light both ( its directly plugged into the electric outlet, so there is no batteries or anytihg like that)
#12
Quote by Dirge Humani
Why did we both think the same things?

If I remember correctly, wiring in series will cause less power at the second bulb.

No, the current will be the same through each of them, so they should light up equally.

In parallel, they would light up differently if they were different types of bulbs. They will however, both light up less in series than in parallel.
Last edited by bnull24 at Jun 1, 2010,
#13
Quote by Dirge Humani
Why did we both think the same things?
How many possible solutions can there be?

Edit:
Quote by bnull24
Electricity does NOT take the path of least resistance. The current splits inversely proportional to the resistances.
That's sounding familiar. The nightmare-ish days of my physics course in electricity and magnetism is coming back to life!
THE OHIO STATE BUCKEYES

Drive! Drive on down the field, men of the scarlet and gray...
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginere
Engenere
I'm good with math.

a0/2 + ∑ an cos(nπx/L) + bn sin(nπx/L)

ĤΨ(x,t) = iħ ∂Ψ(x,t)/∂t
σx σp ≥ h/2
Last edited by Got Guitar? at Jun 1, 2010,
#15
Im thinking a wire is broken or the socket doesnt work. THanks though. ANy other options?
#17
Quote by Dirge Humani
Infinite.
I suppose. Good point.

Edit:
Quote by el rulfo
Im thinking a wire is broken or the socket doesnt work. THanks though. ANy other options?
Yeah, like Thrashtastic said, just make sure the light bulb isn't burnt out. & if it is.
THE OHIO STATE BUCKEYES

Drive! Drive on down the field, men of the scarlet and gray...
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginere
Engenere
I'm good with math.

a0/2 + ∑ an cos(nπx/L) + bn sin(nπx/L)

ĤΨ(x,t) = iħ ∂Ψ(x,t)/∂t
σx σp ≥ h/2
Last edited by Got Guitar? at Jun 1, 2010,
#18
Electricity... I say, get away from that sh*t, it's dangerous!
I'M A COWBOY
#19
Okay. So when you plug a device into a power socket, you can access 120V and 20A or thereabouts, for a total of 2400 W. The standard light bulb is around 60W to 100W. Even the really big floodlight ones are ~500W. So it's not a question of insufficient power being available.

It seems to me as though the only real solution is the wiring. From what you have said, I can only imagine that one or more of the cables for the second light bulb are not connected properly, and hence no (or insufficient) current is able to reach the light bulb.

You should use solder to connect the cables, and then heatshrink over the top of the connection. This is the most reliable way to achieve and maintain a solid connection between the two strands.

To test the connection, you should apply a small voltage at the plug (a few V) and then check with a multimeter that the voltage at the other end of the cable is indeed the same voltage. If it's not, then there's your problem.
#20
wire them in series. i.e connect the positive wire to the potsitive of 1 bulb, connect the negative of that same bulb to the positive of the other bulb, connect the negative of the second bulb back to ground.
#21
Quote by Got Guitar?

Edit:Yeah, like Thrashtastic said, just make sure the light bulb isn't burnt out. & if it is.

I'm willing to bet that it is.