#1
I have asked at least half a dozen proficient guitarists about intervals and non have been able to tell me HOW something is an interval in clear terms. I know what they are, tones and semi tones going from and to an octave. But I havent been able to find out what makes something a minor or major third, and what determines that they are called that. Any help in this matter?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#2
Quote by Slapp62
I have asked at least half a dozen proficient guitarists about intervals and non have been able to tell me HOW something is an interval in clear terms. I know what they are, tones and semi tones going from and to an octave. But I havent been able to find out what makes something a minor or major third, and what determines that they are called that. Any help in this matter?



This might help....

http://www.discoverguitaronline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=231
shred is gaudy music
#3
typically, if an interval is found in a major scale (from the root to a different pitch), it is a major interval. if an interval is found in a minor scale (from the root to a different pitch), it is a minor interval. the only exception to minor intervals is that there is a major second in the minor scale.

i don't really get what you're saying, though. you claim to know intervals, yet you don't understand them. care to elaborate a little more?
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#4
major third is the third in the major scale. minor third is the third in the minor scale.
INTERVALS
Augmented>perfect/major
perfect>diminished
major>minor>diminished
#5
Major third is 4 semitones from the root.
Minor third is 3 semitones from the root.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#6
An interval is the space between two notes.

Generic intervals are Unison, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8ve, etc. We always start with these. You find these by counting how many letter names are between the two notes your looking for. For example, C to G is a 5th because there are 5 letter names from C to G: C D E F G. E to C is a 6th because there are 6 note names from E to C: E F G A B C.

We always base whether something is a major or minor interval based on the major scale. Every interval in there is either Major (the 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th) or Perfect (4th, 5th, 8th). To make something a minor interval we take a Major interval and close the gap by one half step. For example:

Using C Major
C to E is a Major 3rd
Flatten the E (or sharp the C) to get a Minor 3rd, C# to E or C to Eb.

This method works with everything except Perfect intervals. With Perfect intervals there are no major or minor: just Diminished, Perfect, Augmented. In that order.

Using C Major
C to G is a Perfect 5th
Flatten the G (or sharp the C) and we get a Diminished 5th.
If we had C to F and then Sharped the F (or flattened the C) we have an augmented fourth.
#7
Stop complicating it for him.

Root, b2, 2, b3, 3, 4, b5, 5, 6, b7, 7 and back to the octave. Those are the twelve notes of the chromatic scale.

That's it. Some might change because of enharmonics but thats it.
#8
Quote by Pillo114
Stop complicating it for him.

Root, b2, 2, b3, 3, 4, b5, 5, 6, b7, 7 and back to the octave. Those are the twelve notes of the chromatic scale.

That's it. Some might change because of enharmonics but thats it.


Those aren't intervals, those are scale degrees.
#9
Quote by Pillo114
Stop complicating it for him.

Root, b2, 2, b3, 3, 4, b5, 5, 6, b7, 7 and back to the octave. Those are the twelve notes of the chromatic scale.

That's it. Some might change because of enharmonics but thats it.

Then answer his question.

I don't see the complication. Intervals are the space between two notes. That's not very complicated.
#10
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Then answer his question.

I don't see the complication. Intervals are the space between two notes. That's not very complicated.


This is his question

But I havent been able to find out what makes something a minor or major third, and what determines that they are called that.


And my answer was simple, there's no magic to intervals, every note in the chromatic scale starting from the root or the tonic up is designated one in relation to the root. There's no need to give a text book answer that has no practicality.

Those aren't intervals, those are scale degrees.


Where do you think scale degrees come from? Intervals are designated in arabic numbers 3, b3, 4 etc and scale degrees are designated in Roman Numerals I, II, III.

hahahahahahaah
Last edited by Pillo114 at Jun 1, 2010,
#11
1 Half step= Minor Second
2 Half Steps/ 1 whole step = Major Second
3 half = minor 3/ augmented second ( 6 to 7 in harmonic minor
4 half = major 3
5 half = Perfect 4th
6 half= tritone
7 half= P5
and so on.. 12 half steps in an octave....13 half steps would be minor 9th

when you go in scale degress 1-5-1 like at a cadence.. its just a series of perfect 4ths

get aurallia and ul get good at intervals
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#12
Quote by Pillo114
And my answer was simple, there's no magic to intervals, every note in the chromatic scale starting from the root or the tonic up is designated one in relation to the root. There's no need to give a text book answer that has no practicality.

3 =/= M3. 3 is a number. It has no connotation aside from being a scale degree. This doesn't answer his question at all... it doesn't explain how to get Major/Minor intervals.

What's wrong with saying that the Major scale is made up of all Major intervals and if you "close the gap" by one step it becomes minor? That's not very complicated to me and anyone else I know.

There is no practicality in your answers. How often do you actually count step by step to find what interval you're trying to get? Or do you relate it to a scale/chord that you know very well?
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jun 1, 2010,
#13
its not complicated ...

what is complicated is hearing an interval and knowing what it is...
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#14
I have a very good (so I've been told) ground up lesson on Intervals.

http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Intervals/IntervalsTOC.htm

It's 5 part series. Start at the first one and work your way through them. The next one always picks up where the last one left off, so READ THEM IN ORDER.

It will give you a pretty solid foundation in Intervals.
#15
"Represents the mutual relations of the tones with regard to their position in the scale."

Tchaikovsky's definition.

As of where that relationship was formed, the algebraic divisions (sp?) of a string. For further information about this (harmonic and arithmetic proportions applied in music), I'd reccomend Jean-Philippe Rameau's "Treatise On Harmony".

Hope it helps.
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#16
Quote by DiminishedFifth
3 =/= M3. 3 is a number. It has no connotation aside from being a scale degree. This doesn't answer his question at all... it doesn't explain how to get Major/Minor intervals.

What's wrong with saying that the Major scale is made up of all Major intervals and if you "close the gap" by one step it becomes minor? That's not very complicated to me and anyone else I know.

There is no practicality in your answers. How often do you actually count step by step to find what interval you're trying to get? Or do you relate it to a scale/chord that you know very well?


There's no difference between a 3 or a 3rd or M3. I don't know about you but I throw the trash out. And I do count step by step in a way, I know where every single interval in relation to any note in microseconds. I dont have time to sit on my ass and talk about General Intervals or Minor Thirds or closing the gap like pseudo composers can. I just do it.

If you want to talk some theory step up to the big leagues but don't waste my time on crap connotations that don't even have any effect on the music. If the TS likes that way or your way or whatever, then so be it. All I know is I build scales and put them to use faster than a chinese assembly line, do you?
#17
a scale is made up of small intervals... and as ive said before hearing an intervals quality and distance is much more important than naming it...

get auralia student edition.. go to intervals and set it up for minor second to perfect 15th up, down and harmonically.. thats the test of how good you are.. not speed of a scale

if your really wanna get sick (which i do all the time) do chords and thier inervisions lol
f8ckin dominants.. 1st inversion gets me all the time
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#18
Quote by Pillo114
There's no difference between a 3 or a 3rd or M3. I don't know about you but I throw the trash out. And I do count step by step in a way, I know where every single interval in relation to any note in microseconds. I dont have time to sit on my ass and talk about General Intervals or Minor Thirds or closing the gap like pseudo composers can. I just do it.

If you want to talk some theory step up to the big leagues but don't waste my time on crap connotations that don't even have any effect on the music. If the TS likes that way or your way or whatever, then so be it. All I know is I build scales and put them to use faster than a chinese assembly line, do you?

Why yes, yes I do. Thank you for asking.

Don't worry, I am with you in the Big League's. But, from what I got form the TS is that he doesn't know what intervals are, and, if that's not his problem, that's what I assumed based on the way he presented his question. Given this assumption I began to give him the basics. You NEED to be able to tell whether it's a 3rd before you can tell whether or not it's a Major or Minor 3rd.

You also can't "throw out the trash" when it comes to this, because there's a reason we add the M before the 3. If I were to just put a 6 would you just assume it's a M6 or would you think I'm talking about the scale degree or would you get even more confused between whether or not I'm talking about Major or Minor 6ths?

The "trash" is there for a reason.


Quote by seymour_jackson
if your really wanna get sick (which i do all the time) do chords and thier inervisions lol
f8ckin dominants.. 1st inversion gets me all the time

I always thought that the Dominant was the easiest to hear out of them all xD

But once you get to 7ths they all have a certain sound to them that's distinguishable.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jun 1, 2010,
#19
dominant inversions?? i can hear that its dominant but 1st inversion and root always always get me..

same for major 1st inversion
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#20
Quote by seymour_jackson
dominant inversions?? i can hear that its dominant but 1st inversion and root always always get me..

same for major 1st inversion

Haha just sing the intervals if you can... that's always helped me!

the hardest one for me is telling the inversions of the Fully Diminished 7th chord

(please tell me you get it >>
#21
hahaha im known as diminshed man in school lol... yea fully diminshed gives me some chopin feeling kinda thing

half= jazz rippage lol
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#22
First, an interval is the space between two notes, such as C to D, or G to B, and so on. Intervals are given their names based upon the major scale. To find these, you need to first determine how many note names are between the two notes. What i mean is , if you start on C and want to get to say... F, count C D E F *Ignore any accidentals for now*. if you counted right, you should get 4, so it it a type of Fourth interval.

Now, you can do this one of either two ways. To find out if an interval is major or minor (only works for 2, 3, 6, and 7ths) or perfect, diminished, or augmented (only works for unison [1], 4, 5, and 8 [same as 1], you can related it back to the major scale. All intervals are considered major or perfect. so...
from C to C is perfect unison
from C to D is Major second
C to E major third
C to F perfect forth (remember, you major/minor doesnt work for 1,4,5,8)
C to G is pefect fifth
C to A is major sixth
C to B is major 7th
and C to C is perfect octave. and then they repeat to higher numbers, such as 9,10, all up to 13. You could go further then that, but its normally not necessary.

Now that was obviously based on the C major scale. now, say you wanted to use a minor third? or sixth? all you have to do, is lower the note a half step. So for a minor third in C, you would flatten the E to Eb. C to Eb is a minor third, C to Db is a minor second, C to Ab is a minor 6th, and C to Bb is a minor 7th. Same goes for perfects. to get a diminish, you lower the perfect note a half step. so instead of C to G, you would have C to Gb. Augmented works the same way, but instead, you raise the note, which would be C to G#

The other way of naming intervals takes more time, but I used it a lot back when I didn't refer to the major scale, and thats to learn the amount of halfsteps/semitones there were between the two notes. Between C and Eb was 3 semitones, but this method isn't too great, because there are multiple intervals with the same number of halfsteps. an Augmented 4th would have the same semitones as a diminished 5th, which is why I don't recommend this.

I hope this helped
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#23
thanks everyone, i think im getting the hang of it. UG is awesome.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.