#1
Hey guys, just doing an essay for a politics course and I'm noting how politics and religion affect each other. For example, Muslims in France, Shi'ite and Sunni Muslims in Iran. but I can't think of any way I can make this relevant to America.

Has anyone got any ideas?
#2
You mean like, the US govt vs religion? Generally speaking, the US doesnt make any laws about religion. Its one of the most unconstitutional things you can do. There is religious influence in the govt though
#3
Yeah, I'm using the whole 'seperation of church and state' as a point, but I'm just wondering if there is any way that religion does affect politics. If at all.
#4
It can affect which officials get elected. When JFK ran for president, some people were afraid the Catholic Church would run the government.
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#5
gay marriage laws?

I know it's a state thing rather than federal but where there aren't any it's usually because of a religious opposition to it.
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#6
How about, oh, the entire anti-gay horseshit?
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#7
Quote by tyler_j
Yeah, I'm using the whole 'seperation of church and state' as a point, but I'm just wondering if there is any way that religion does affect politics. If at all.


Every single US president has been protestant christian. Wait, except kennedy, he was catholic. But theyve all been christian, and generally uphold "christian" values (whatever that means).

I think the govt generally favors things that christians would like, but I dont think we have anything you could legitimately call a violation of the separation of church and state. Of course, as soon as I say that, someone will show me an example where it did happen

EDIT: There is the gay marriage thing. Also, people are trying to outlaw abortion
#9
Of course religion affects politics. Each politician was raised to his own moral standards, which if a religious person, probably branches off of that. Now when it comes time to making laws and such, that person might go "hmm, I don't really think gay people should be able to marry because it is against my religion." I think if a politician is religious than his or her views are going to be reflected in each of their decisions.
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#10
Iran is mostly Shi'i

I think you meant Iraq
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#11
Quote by TunerAddict
Iran is mostly Shi'i

I think you meant Iraq


Nah, I meant Iran. I know they're *mostly* Shi'i, but there's still the disagreement between the two groups. (I think :/)
#12
Quote by tubatom868686
Every single US president has been protestant christian. Wait, except kennedy, he was catholic. But theyve all been christian, and generally uphold "christian" values (whatever that means).

Except the 10 or so that weren't affiliated with a religion.
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#13
well if it's a country for the people...and most of the people are christian...what kind of morals, standards, and laws do you think will be upheld?
#14
Quote by tyler_j
Nah, I meant Iran. I know they're *mostly* Shi'i, but there's still the disagreement between the two groups. (I think :/)


Not really. 89% Shi'i

Iraq on the other hand has feuds between the two, mostly as a result of long term oppression of the Shi'i majority by the Sunni minority under Saddam.
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#15
Quote by TunerAddict
Not really. 89% Shi'i

Iraq on the other hand has feuds between the two, mostly as a result of long term oppression of the Shi'i majority by the Sunni minority under Saddam.


Ah sweet, thanks man.
#16
As far as separation of church and state, I'm neutral. The political climate Christ lived in was far from perfect, but the most he said about it was "give to Caeser what is Caeser's." He wasn't really concerned about it at all.
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#17
Protestant Christans and the US?

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/12/14/critics-say-atheist-nc-city-councilman-unworthy-seat/
http://www.nysun.com/national/california-lawmaker-becomes-highest-ranking/50312/

Not to mention gay rights, abortion...The Texas schoolbook rewrites...

Religion strongly affects government in the united states and it has since its conception.
#18
*sigh* i dont usually do people's homework and im definitely not writing a thesis for you but here's a couple of your core argumentative paragraphs:

1. Religion is closely parallel to politics in the US. While the country was not actually founded on religion [do some research here to validate the position], the founding fathers were all protestant christian. It's no surprise, then, that the people most willing to uphold those protestant ideologies are the people being voted for, the ones running the country--high-level politicians. Every president not named JFK has been protestant christian and this is no coincidence.

2. Politicians need a basic fundamental facet of lifestyles to campaign and appeal to: religion. Most politicians make public their religious affiliations which attracts people of those sects. This in turn contributes greatly to their following/support--three-quarters of the country declare themselves protestant christian, and again that reflects the affiliations of politician. The cynic says it's very often used as a tool to further individual political agendas, but the fool objects.
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#19
Quote by Mr. B.
Of course religion affects politics. Each politician was raised to his own moral standards, which if a religious person, probably branches off of that. Now when it comes time to making laws and such, that person might go "hmm, I don't really think gay people should be able to marry because it is against my religion." I think if a politician is religious than his or her views are going to be reflected in each of their decisions.

Sometimes not, I'm a Christian and I'm all for legalizing gay marriage.


Yes, I know that makes me a bad Christian and whatnot, blah blah blah, flame me and move on with your lives.
#20
Quote by tubatom868686
Every single US president has been protestant christian. Wait, except kennedy, he was catholic. But theyve all been christian, and generally uphold "christian" values (whatever that means).

I think the govt generally favors things that christians would like, but I dont think we have anything you could legitimately call a violation of the separation of church and state. Of course, as soon as I say that, someone will show me an example where it did happen

EDIT: There is the gay marriage thing. Also, people are trying to outlaw abortion

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#21
Srsly? Just make up some shit about how U.S. politics are founded on Christian principles, particulary the justice system.
#22
Quote by wannabestoner69
False Jefferson was a deist and I believe Washington was as well but I'm not sure


Americans in the late 1700s would have had no problems calling Deists protestant Christians. We only make that distinction today.
in the 1700s they were much more concerned about Jews, Catholics and Anglicans. (and in PA they weren't fond of Quakers being in politics either) Distinctions we make today and they made then are quite different as far as what protestant or christian meant.

even if we say the founding fathers were Deists not protestants. they no doubt took christian ideals into consideration in framing the country. I hardly believe they ever believed the country would be host to hindus, buddhists, muslims, atheists etc. considering the limited contact they had with other religions. even if they weren't modern born again Christians, Christianity was pretty much all they knew.
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