#1
Many of you already seen Satriani's YouTube videos for ( I think it's called) surfing or something with surfing in it for that matter. He talks of switching his chords from C Phrygian to F# Phrygian to ? Phrygian (I don't know exact names.) does this mean any chord fits with any chord if it sounds good? This basicly tells everything I read about modal music and how you have to do this and that you have to have these chords and tells it to **** off. Makes me curious how he came up with linking Phrygian scales...
#2
its called surfing with the alien or something


cause of the notes the scales share ?

but hey if it sounds good it fits too.
Last edited by Coagulation at Jun 2, 2010,
#4
Quote by cj_lespaul
Many of you already seen Satriani's YouTube videos for ( I think it's called) surfing or something with surfing in it for that matter. He talks of switching his chords from C Phrygian to F# Phrygian to ? Phrygian (I don't know exact names.) does this mean any chord fits with any chord if it sounds good? This basicly tells everything I read about modal music and how you have to do this and that you have to have these chords and tells it to **** off. Makes me curious how he came up with linking Phrygian scales...

Because he knows his shit, simple as.

If you're just learning theory Satch is probably the last person you want to be studying at this stage. However one thing he does a lot is kind of a "modal breakdown" where he'll drop out of the main song structure and vamp on a single chord for an extended time, that gives him long enoungh to establish a new tonal centre and allows him riff on a mode for a while before dropping back into the song.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Yeah surfing the Alien.
I know he knows his shit but he doesn't "correctly use it" according to modal standards I've read. It's not modal if you're not focusing on one mode and just switch around. Thus is how I've seen modes just as different tonal centres and I can use them as I please everyones told me
"no it's not Dorian this or Phrygian that" but it makes me wonder if I want to think that then I can.
#6
He does use stuff correctly - that's why he uses those extended passages. The musician is only part of the equation when it comes to music, the listener plays an important part too. In the west we're conditioned to expect certain things of music, the major scale is everywhere and we're constantly exposed to it from the day we're born.

When we listen to music we'll fixate on the tonic and spend the rest of the song waiting for it to return to it, through various chord changes and what have you. However, if you spend long enough on a single chord or bassline you can convince the listener that the tonal centre lies elsewhere, I think it takes something like 9 seconds for the brain to forget what it was waiting for. So if you move away from your main song structure and temporarily create a different tonal centre for the listener then you can chuck a modal passage in there, and you can keep doing that for various modes provided you choose your chords carefully and don't give the listener anything that's going to point them back to the original tonic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
Quote by steven seagull
He does use stuff correctly - that's why he uses those extended passages. The musician is only part of the equation when it comes to music, the listener plays an important part too. In the west we're conditioned to expect certain things of music, the major scale is everywhere and we're constantly exposed to it from the day we're born.

When we listen to music we'll fixate on the tonic and spend the rest of the song waiting for it to return to it, through various chord changes and what have you. However, if you spend long enough on a single chord or bassline you can convince the listener that the tonal centre lies elsewhere, I think it takes something like 9 seconds for the brain to forget what it was waiting for. So if you move away from your main song structure and temporarily create a different tonal centre for the listener then you can chuck a modal passage in there, and you can keep doing that for various modes provided you choose your chords carefully and don't give the listener anything that's going to point them back to the original tonic.


so does this mean that if it sounds good and if i use a root of the scale i'm using(or an accidental) i can alter it any which way even say if the b7 isn't in it i can just play a pentatonics or blues scale over it or just alter the notes for the melody and if the chords sound good together there's no limit to the music you can create?

And why would someone want to switch away from the tonal centre? you're a very smart man
#8
If it sounds good... use it...

would you like some milk to go with that ass kissing? He is a smart one... but he's a bird
#9
Quote by evolucian
If it sounds good... use it...

would you like some milk to go with that ass kissing? He is a smart one... but he's a bird


lol thanks
#10
Quote by cj_lespaul
Yeah surfing the Alien.
I know he knows his shit but he doesn't "correctly use it" according to modal standards I've read.
Thus proving that he knows his shit!

And players like Satch and Vai sort of bend the rules of modal harmony through methods such as pitch axis theory which allow you to transition through multiple modes.

The operative phrase in that sentence is "bend the rules." Proof that they truly know their shit is that they know how to do this and make it sound good. Sure you could know your way up and down the major scale the minor scales, and a whole bunch of modes/modal harmony, but that only gets you so far. Learning how to bend the rules is what really makes you a musician.

Quote by cj_lespaul
so does this mean that if it sounds good and if i use a root of the scale i'm using(or an accidental) i can alter it any which way even say if the b7 isn't in it i can just play a pentatonics or blues scale over it or just alter the notes for the melody and if the chords sound good together there's no limit to the music you can create?
I actually agree with evolucian completely here; If it sounds good, USE IT!

Quote by cj_lespaul
And why would someone want to switch away from the tonal centre?
To spice up the music a bit. Modulations are great, when used right. They open up so many more options.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 2, 2010,
#12
One good Satch song that helped me out alot, was 'Always with me, always with you'

Slow, tasty song, and he tours through B major, to B minor and back again......

I found it good for understanding various note to chord relationships.....