#1
my band's vocalist and bassist got into and arguement whether putting weights on your diaphram will help you to breath better for vocals. vocalist said that doing that will make your reathing stronger..he said that he saw it on youtube and hat the guy had a degree in music. our bassist said taht doing that, it will cause something about your lungs to work wrong or get effed up. he was told this by his doctors and weight trainers...but who's right
#2
The bassist is always wrong.

Also, my friend's singing teacher tells her to put heavy books on her stomach.
#3
Your supposed to put books on your diaphragm, not your lungs. If the bassist said put weights on his stomach, that makes it sound like your putting irons on your chest, which a doctor would generally discourage.

As long as it's not too heavy I don't see why it would harm you in any way.
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#4
If you had weights pulling down on your diaphragm you wouldn't be able to breath, you fool
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#5
I have a degree in music too. I say it sounds stupid.

There are exercises to make your diaphragm more pliable and to better coordinate the breathing mechanism, but none of the ones I know involve using weights.

Also, the diaphragm, though it is a muscle, is not really able to be strengthened. Your heart is a muscle too, but you can't strengthen it either. It's kinda like that.

You want to make it pliable and resilient, and you want to be able to control it, but if you don't need to strengthen it, then the use of weights seems kinda pointless, now, doesn't it?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
My vocal instructor has neve advised me to do that! There are certain exercises you can do to work the proper stomach muscles and voice muscles for singing...but weights on your stomach sounds a little dangerous to me. There are definitely exercises but that isn't one of them.
#8
No, that's insanely ridiculous. People just tend to take the diaphragmatic support thing to the nth degree. It's kind of like if people took the classic baseball "keep your eyes on the ball" advice and ran with it ("seriously, never take your eyes off the ball, even if you're running, or you already have the ball in your glove, or if you're not even playing baseball, or if you're taking a shit.") Yeah, you should breathe from your diaphragm. That's where it ends. If you're breathing from your diaphragm, you're fine.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
I have a degree in music too. I say it sounds stupid.

There are exercises to make your diaphragm more pliable and to better coordinate the breathing mechanism, but none of the ones I know involve using weights.

Also, the diaphragm, though it is a muscle, is not really able to be strengthened. Your heart is a muscle too, but you can't strengthen it either. It's kinda like that.

You want to make it pliable and resilient, and you want to be able to control it, but if you don't need to strengthen it, then the use of weights seems kinda pointless, now, doesn't it?

CT

I'm pretty sure you can strengthen your heart, hence why athletes have lower heart rates, because they have stronger hearts due to all the exercise they do.
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#10
Lower heart rates are a function of overall fitness, not how "strong" your heart is.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Whilst it may be able to enhance the strength of the diaphram, it would be in relation to outside forces pushing upon it. So it could be useful if someone punched you there, but not for the actions of singing.

Just practice using exercises like Axeman suggested, and you'll also learn how to sing along the way, while replicating the actions required to sing.

Edit: That said, the diaphram is already pretty strong - we use it to breath constantly. I was under the impression that learning to sing is learning how to train specific actions from the diaphram and associated singing body parts rather than strengthening them.
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#12
Quote by AlanHB
Edit: That said, the diaphram is already pretty strong - we use it to breath constantly. I was under the impression that learning to sing is learning how to train specific actions from the diaphram and associated singing body parts rather than strengthening them.
I think this is exactly what it is. Your diaphragm is plenty strong, you just need to learn how to use that strength properly.
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