#1
When I search tabs for songs sometimes they give the chords by writing the lyrics with chords above the words. I'm new at this,so how do i know how many times to strum each chord. I understand basic tabs but, not when they write chords like this.
#2
I usually just try to think of something that sounds good,if Its hard for me to find one I listen to the song and try to hear the guitar in the background.
#3
thats the problem with tabs/chord sheets... you need to listen to the song for timing etc... unless it's a bass tab, those guys tend to notate the 1 e and a's; i've never actually understood why guitar tabs aren't the same :/
#4
Quote by Markus85
thats the problem with tabs/chord sheets... you need to listen to the song for timing etc... unless it's a bass tab, those guys tend to notate the 1 e and a's; i've never actually understood why guitar tabs aren't the same :/


Thats simple. It's because Bass players/Tabbers/Tabs are the most amazing and greatest people, musicians and resources on the interwebs.
#5
Quote by sparky3
When I search tabs for songs sometimes they give the chords by writing the lyrics with chords above the words. I'm new at this,so how do i know how many times to strum each chord. I understand basic tabs but, not when they write chords like this.


That's the problem with chord&lyric sheets -- they don't give you any indication of the tempo, time signature or strumming patterns (ie, rhythm). They only show chord changes. There are a couple of ways you can resolve this.

Firstly, listen to the song carefully and try and pick up the chord changes. Count the number of beats between the chord changes and annotate your chord sheet accordingly. This works well if the chord changes are clear, but for an untrained ear can be a bit of a challenge if the changes are frequent and/or subtle.

Alternatively, try and get your hands on the sheet music. You don't need to be able to read the detail of the sheet music, just note the chord names above each bar, and roughly where they are positioned. This will give you a guide on the number of beats per chord. I'll borrow the sheet music from my local library, or just go to a music shop, find the song I'm looking for and make a mental note of some of the more complicated chord changes. That saves me from buying a book of songs when I'm only interested in a single piece.

You can also look at powertab/guitarpro tabs (if available). But IME, they rarely have chords marked.

Finally, if I'm really struggling, I'll ask a more musically experienced friend (or my music teacher) if they can help me determine the beats per chord change.

The end result is that I have a stack of chord sheets with all my hand written annotations.
#6
Quote by Puppet_616
Thats simple. It's because Bass players/Tabbers/Tabs are the most amazing and greatest people, musicians and resources on the interwebs.


lol, play bass much? i just figured they had more time what with only having to play root notes and all
#7
Quote by Markus85
lol, play bass much? i just figured they had more time what with only having to play root notes and all


Just because we don't show off with the whole "oh look at me, I can play 3 notes at the same time and not make it sound like a muddy mess" haha!