#1
i have recently started writing drum lines for some songs i hace writen. now i am a very basic drummer as im a guitarist but im good at hearin what the drums should sound like wen i play the guitar parts to my songs, what id like to know tho is is it best to have seperate drum lines for each part of the song (i.e. a drum line for the verae then a different one for the chorus then another for the prechorus, etc) or is it better to have 1 or 2 drum lines that run throughout the song?

thankyou in advance guys
#2
"better" isn't the right word to use.

let me ask you this: would you rather have a different guitar line for each part of the song? or would you rather have 1 or 2 guitar lines that you use over and over?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
It all depends on the song, I think that the drum line is a good way to change the sound of the song as you are going through, so when you want the feel of your song to change, changing the drums is a very good way to do it.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#4
"im good at hearin what the drums should sound like wen i play the guitar parts to my songs"

Awesome, then you're set. Don't worry about what we think is best because if you're already hearing the drum part you want in your head then it's all good.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#5
Quote by Eastwinn

Awesome, then you're set. Don't worry about what we think is best because if you're already hearing the drum part you want in your head then it's all good.


This.

Make the drums whatever you want, but be aware that hearing the drums in your head can be realised faster in reality if you learn about certain bass, snare and hi-hat etc. conventions. Once I got a grasp of that stuff (even though I could hear the rhythms I wanted before learning about them) I was flying, and I don't even play the drums.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Jun 2, 2010,
#6
The above is true. You can learn those conventions by playing Rock Band Drums on Expert. No really, for once, it helps. It gives you a great glimpse into the way drum tracks look visually.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#7
TS, how complex do you want the drumline stuff to be? Theres a big difference between playing a rock beat with a drumline and the santa clara van guard
#8
thanls for the replies. i have just been writing them riff by riff and using the drums for guitar hero has helped alot
#9
Quote by Eastwinn
The above is true. You can learn those conventions by playing Rock Band Drums on Expert. No really, for once, it helps. It gives you a great glimpse into the way drum tracks look visually.


Really?!, I've never been able to learn ANYTHING from Rock Band, that always just screwed me up! I guess if that works for you then stick with it, but I never really thought it worked very well.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#10
Drum lines? I always called them drum beats, but maybe I'm the one who's wrong here...

Anyways, in a band setting consistency is generally the thing you're going for...if you change the beat every four measures then someones going to get really frustrated with you, but sometimes changes are necessary. For example, in a bridge I might wanna play something on the ride to get a new texture, or maybe I'll go to a double time feel to change things up a bit (a common technique for punk rock)...it just depends what's going on in your head, or what the emotion/feel of the song calls for. These rules aren't really set in stone, so it's mostly your choice, but generally there's a standard beat that fits the song until a chorus comes up, and then you'll maybe make the beat a little busier (adding some ghost notes on the snare and such), and then when a bridge comes up you'll play the ride cymbal to get a new sound...but it still depends on the song

Hope that makes sense
#11
Some drum parts are complex and seem to never play the same thing twice (check out Yes).
Some drum parts are simple and seem to never change (check out punk).

Just follow your heart.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#12
^ I've just always said drum line because it's consistent with bass line. Whatever :idunno:

sites.nick: I'm not suggesting trying to use Rock Band to learn how to play drums (bad idea) but it's great to get a glimpse at what drummers are actually doing behind their sets, and it connects a visual, linear representation of a drum beat with the actual song.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#13
^ ohhh, I can see how that would work... also, if you're trying to see what the drummers doing, you can watch different music videos that you like, and just pay attention to the drummer.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#14
Quote by sites.nick
^ ohhh, I can see how that would work... also, if you're trying to see what the drummers doing, you can watch different music videos that you like, and just pay attention to the drummer.

I may have only sat behind a drum set a few times, but I'm a damned good air drummer! I've developed a great ear for drums by fitting tons of songs onto my imaginary set.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#15
Quote by hockeyplayer168
I may have only sat behind a drum set a few times, but I'm a damned good air drummer! I've developed a great ear for drums by fitting tons of songs onto my imaginary set.


Oh, please...that's like saying I'm a great singer because I can hum melodies...takes no skill
#17
My best advice can be to someone who is just beginning to write drumlines is to keep it simple. The most basic of transition is to switch from hats to ride when you go from verse to chorus for example. Then add extra kicks. One of the things I did to improve my drumwritings is to try and "copy" the complete drums from a popular song, from hip-hop to rock.
#18
Thank you all again, this is all very helpful.
I call them drum lines as thats what the band i was last in drummer called them.
I don't change every so many bars/measures/whatever lol when i said i write them riff by riff i meant i write the drumline for the verse, then change it slightly for the next riff if that works then change it again for the chorus or write a new line/beat if that works better.
But, yeah, anyhoos thanks for all the tips and advice, if anyone else has more then keep it coming as at the moment i am a 1 man band unfortunatly so got to learn all i can lol
#19
Quote by justaramsfan
Oh, please...that's like saying I'm a great singer because I can hum melodies...takes no skill

No, it's not like that at all. Dick.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#20
Quote by hockeyplayer168
No, it's not like that at all. Dick.


Excuse me, Mr. Sensitive?
#21
Quote by justaramsfan
Excuse me, Mr. Sensitive?

I'm not being sensitive, you're just being a dick.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#22
Quote by hockeyplayer168
I'm not being sensitive, you're just being a dick.


I guess...I was really just being sarcastic, doesn't mean you had to be offended?