#1
i have a riff that is kind of wierd and i dont really know any way to put a rhythm underneath it and my rhythm player is kind of new to guitar so he cant keep up with me on playing the riff, so i was wondering if you guys had any methods, tips, tricks or anything to put rhythms under lead parts that could help me out, and if you need the riff to do this i will post it below after a few responses.
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#2
Make sure they're in key?

You haven't given much to go on.
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#3
Quote by syke5
i have a riff that is kind of wierd and i dont really know any way to put a rhythm underneath it and my rhythm player is kind of new to guitar so he cant keep up with me on playing the riff, so i was wondering if you guys had any methods, tips, tricks or anything to put rhythms under lead parts that could help me out, and if you need the riff to do this i will post it below after a few responses.
Often times a solo is similar to what happens during the verses in a song. You could probably start with whatever rhythm guitar part is used there, then adapt it if necessary.
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#4
You need to make sure that the root note is the same in both the rythm and the lead. If you don't know what a root note is, you may need to study up on some theory and other such stuff...

Power Chords are really easy to use in rythm, and your rythm guitarist will probably be able to keep up with you if he's using them. It's also much easier to write with power chords.
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#5
Two basic options would be for the rhythm player to play constant 1/4, 1/8 or 1/16th notes, depending on the tempo, or alternatively he could playing the same rhythm as your lead part using static chords.