#1
Do i need to know what key im playing in to harmonize two guitars? Say i start a riff on the A note 6th string.....can i harmonize it an octave higher by having the other guitar play the exact same riff starting on A on the 4th D string?


Also, how do i harmonize in 3rds and stuff?
#3
When people talk about harmonizing, they generally mean doing it diatonically, meaning all of the notes, including the harmonized ones, are in key.

You have to know your theory to do that.
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#4
wouldn't really be a third if it wasn't in the key..to answer your question simply yes, you would need to know the key to harmonize two guitars. it also depends what harmony you are going for which complicates things..
#5
Quote by guitar102938475
Do i need to know what key im playing in to harmonize two guitars? Say i start a riff on the A note 6th string.....can i harmonize it an octave higher by having the other guitar play the exact same riff starting on A on the 4th D string?


Also, how do i harmonize in 3rds and stuff?

i wouldn't really call playing in octaves harmonizing, but it technically is, so i can't argue. that's absolutely correct - you can certainly do that.

harmonizing in 3rds, however, you certainly need to know what key you're playing in. you also need to know the notes in that key.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/soloing/soloing_basics_part_3_-_harmonizing.html

check that lesson out.
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#6
say your runing up A major
A B C# D E F# G#A
your harmonized thirds lick would be its phrygian or start simply on the 3rd degree
C# D E F# G# A B C#
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#7
yes you need to know the key or else your music will sound like random crap and not be structured or anything. some people like that though
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#8
that would be octave harmonization ...
you can also harmonize with other intervals like major 3rd , perfect fourth etc.
or you can harmonize with 2 different scales with same intervals , this sounds cooler i guess.
#9
Quote by seymour_jackson
say your runing up A major
A B C# D E F# G#A
your harmonized thirds lick would be its phrygian or start simply on the 3rd degree
C# D E F# G# A B C#



So what if i played a riff that used the notes from the natural minor scale in A starting on the fifth fret of the E string. Could the second guitar start on the third degree which is C i think, on the 8th fret E string and play the same riff?

Even though the second guitar would now be playing out of the A minor scale?
#10
Quote by guitar102938475
So what if i played a riff that used the notes from the natural minor scale in A starting on the fifth fret of the E string. Could the second guitar start on the third degree which is C i think, on the 8th fret E string and play the same riff?

Even though the second guitar would now be playing out of the A minor scale?

You can do whatever you want.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#11
Quote by hockeyplayer168
You can do whatever you want.



Yeah.....i know that.....but would that be harmonized in thirds or what?
#13
Quote by kian89
Man that is harmonized in Octave , you said that yourself



Starting on 5th fret E string, and the second guitar starting on 8th fret E string and playing the same riff....how is that an octave?
#14
Quote by guitar102938475
Starting on 5th fret E string, and the second guitar starting on 8th fret E string and playing the same riff....how is that an octave?

It is minor thirds. Just jam it out and see how it sounds.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#15
Quote by guitar102938475
So what if i played a riff that used the notes from the natural minor scale in A starting on the fifth fret of the E string. Could the second guitar start on the third degree which is C i think, on the 8th fret E string and play the same riff?

You could. I forget the name for it. It won't be a diatonic harmony though (not all of the notes the second guitar plays would be in A minor, in order to do that just change the out of key notes).
Try it out. If you like it, use it.
#17
Quote by guitar102938475
Do i need to know what key im playing in to harmonize two guitars? Say i start a riff on the A note 6th string.....can i harmonize it an octave higher by having the other guitar play the exact same riff starting on A on the 4th D string?


Also, how do i harmonize in 3rds and stuff?


this is your initial post
#18
You can harmonize however you want. However, if you are harmonizing in "thirds" there are three main mays to do it:

1. You can harmonize in major thirds. Just play the same riff but 4 semitones (4 frets) up.
2. You can harmonize in minor thirds. Just play the same riff but 3 semitones up.

However, both of these are likely to sound weird. For a normal diatonic song (a song that stays mainly in key) these won't soung great. You can still experiment with them because they can sound good in the right context.

3. The most common way to harmonize in "thirds" is to harmonize in diatonic thirds. Diatonic means "in key" so you play whatever third is in the same key. This will leave you with a mixture of major and minor thirds. For example:

If you have a riff that has the notes C, E, G, A and B in it. This riff is in the key of C major. So you take your C major scale:
C D E F G A B C
Now, take your first note, which is C and count along two notes in the scale. You get the note E. So whenever you have a C is the original riff you replace it with a E in the harmonized version.

Next, take the note E. Count along two and you get G. So whenever you had an E in the first riff replace it with a G in the harmonized version.

Continue to do this for all the notes and you'll get your original riff harmonized in diatonic thirds.

However, there are also lots of other ways you can harmonize. For starters, you can harmonize in any of the ways above using any interval (eg. 4ths, 6ths). You can also harmonize by using lots of different intervals (eg. the first note is harmonized in thirds, the second in sixths etc.) and you can also just use a completely different melody to harmonize with your original one.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Jun 4, 2010,