#1
I kept having problems with the G string or B string for barre chords. For barre chords in the E shape, I would have problems with G string and while for barre chords in the A shape, I would have problems with the B string as I move my barring finger down to not play the low E string. I would almost mute these strings and no matter how hard I press, my finger won't be able to fret the G or B string(depending on the chord shape) to let it ring out.

And because the G and B string are often the 3rd degree note for the chord, it is so important or I won't hear the difference between a minor, major or 7th chord kind of things.

I am on a acoustic. Is this normal? Are there tricks and tips on fretting it so that the G or B string is not always muted.
#2
Sounds like you're still in the process of building up your finger strength, more than anything
#3
Try examing your thumb position. When i'm having trouble barring sometimes shifting my thumb higher or lower helps.
#5
Quote by voodoochild23
Sounds like you're still in the process of building up your finger strength, more than anything

This.
And, at least for now, don't worry about muting the E string on A-shaped chords. If you keep the whole barre, the chord will usually sound close enough because you're just playing an extra fifth.
#6
I don't have problems barring the other strings but always these 2 strings... it is annoying..
#7
I'm confused.. With the E major shape you should be playing the G string with your middle finger (barring only the E, B, and e), and with the A major shape you should be playing the B string with your pinky (barring only the A and e).

With Em and Asus2 shapes on the other hand, I used to have the exact same problem you describe. Try practicing barring all 6 strings with your index finger and moving your finger around (up/down, closer/farther from fret, roll it on its side) until you find a position that works for your finger shape.
#8
You can also play with the angle your barring finger is "rolled" at. If your finger is flat on the fretboard, the strings can get in the creases between finger joints. Try rolling your fretting finger so the nail faces more towards the headstock (it shouldnt take much). If you can find a comfortable spot, that can help too.
#9
Also, try practicing them higher up in the fretboard. Around 7th fret or higher. It takes less strength so you can build it up a little more gradually. Oh, and you'll take a while to perfect the A major position, even after you master the others.
#10
Quote by Oppenheimer
You can also play with the angle your barring finger is "rolled" at. If your finger is flat on the fretboard, the strings can get in the creases between finger joints. Try rolling your fretting finger so the nail faces more towards the headstock (it shouldnt take much). If you can find a comfortable spot, that can help too.

basically used the side of your barre finger since there's less padding there.
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#11
I have like tried all positions. I even placed my index finger to barre the whole fret and then roll it like from left to right in its x-axis but none of the angle could help me to not miss out either the G or B string. I am also already fretting very close to the fretbar and pressing very hard until my thumb could feel painful. But I just don't understand why I couldn't fret just that. I have been practising for weeks.
#12
It'll take more than a few weeks to get the hang of barre chords on an acoustic guitar, well it took me quite a while, I'm still pretty lazy with it but eventually you just get better at it, you can reach further, easier, and all that, you will play clearer and louder notes because your fingers are capable of pressing down with a lot less effort.

Fret the low E with your thumb whenever you can too, that's the only 'tip' that springs to mind
#13
Quote by vEr5eX
I have like tried all positions. I even placed my index finger to barre the whole fret and then roll it like from left to right in its x-axis but none of the angle could help me to not miss out either the G or B string. I am also already fretting very close to the fretbar and pressing very hard until my thumb could feel painful. But I just don't understand why I couldn't fret just that. I have been practising for weeks.
You're still not making any sense, you don't barre the G string on an E shape and you don't barre the B string on an A shape. So what are you talking about?
#14
Quote by van01010100
You're still not making any sense, you don't barre the G string on an E shape and you don't barre the B string on an A shape. So what are you talking about?


ok maybe I had a mistake here. I meant...

G String Problem - E Major, Em, etc shapes. Because I couldn't fully press on the G string, I could here the difference between the major and minor when I lift off my middle finger on the G string from a major shape to a minor shape.

B String Problem - A Major, Am, A7, etc shapes. Same thing as above just that it happens on the B string.
#15
I prefer Boxers.

Seriously? 14 posts and no crude remarks about G strings? You guys have changed.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#16
Quote by Deep*Kick
I prefer Boxers.

Seriously? 14 posts and no crude remarks about G strings? You guys have changed.



The Technique Thread has matured, haha. Less people from the pit bleeding over.
#17
Meh. You're just weak. Just keep practicing and you'll get'em. Don't put too much tension on your fingers though (ie, pressing too hard on the frets), otherwise you'll strain'em and cause injury that may last a looong time. My best advice would be to make sure that you stretch your fingers before and after you practice; and take rests after 30 minutes of playing. Listen to your hands: if they hurt, stop immediately or risk injury; the "no pain no gain" saying doesn't apply. Treat the entire guitar practice like a workout at the gym with only your hands.

Oh yah, you might want to start learning your bar chords on an electric cause it's easier. Later you can move to acoustic.
Last edited by ajsguitar at Jun 4, 2010,
#18
Quote by vEr5eX
ok maybe I had a mistake here. I meant...

G String Problem - E Major, Em, etc shapes. Because I couldn't fully press on the G string, I could here the difference between the major and minor when I lift off my middle finger on the G string from a major shape to a minor shape.

B String Problem - A Major, Am, A7, etc shapes. Same thing as above just that it happens on the B string.
Ok thanks for explaining yourself (although with Am and A7 you're still not barring the B string ). Like the guy above me mentioned, playing barre chords on an acoustic is much harder, the advice already in this thread is about as much as you're gonna find. If all else fails you could always try to find a guitar with a smaller fretboard radius, the extra curve makes barring a bit easier.