#1
I really need to do it, it's reallly useful. But i just cant find a way of doing this, and im trying for some months. How did you do it?
#2
I just played a lot. It'll take some time to memorize it but it just takes time. I'll play scales all over the board and just name the notes out loud or think of the notes in my head rather than just memorizing a scale shape.
#3
Learn it, dont memorize it - there is a difference

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#5
i've always struggled learning the notes aswell, however i have no trouble naming all the notes in any given major scale so i assume it's not because i'm dense or anything, lol.

tyler, that's an interesting statement... could you go into more depth? unless you're too busy making soap out of fat ladies asses
#6
i think tyler means to practice and not just stare at it thinking about what notes are where. in other words play scales, say the notes out loud, choose a random note and find all the occurrences of it all over the fret board.
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#7
Quote by Duarteman
I really need to do it, it's reallly useful. But i just cant find a way of doing this, and im trying for some months. How did you do it?



Become proficient at reading standard notation in all positions.

not a short cut, but you WILL know all the notes on your guitar.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Become proficient at reading standard notation in all positions.

not a short cut, but you WILL know all the notes on your guitar.


Give the programm a try, it involves using your guitar as well...trust me, it uses multiple training methods, it really gets fast results, also trains your ears abit while you use it, sometimes a shortcut is the way to go
#9
i draw.. in a book of graph paper
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#10
there is no "best" way...as we have different "learning rates"...but some factors that are a must...
determination
persistence
patients
reinforcement

learning the quirks of the fretboard come to us at different rates....there are some breakthroughs that happen at certain points...

patterns are nice...but dont rely on them...they wont tell you the note names

learn scales on one string at a time in all keys..

many pick up the guitar and automatically play something they have always played...if thats you...do you know the notes your playing...learn the notes...

if there is a "melody line" in your playing..learn the notes..
yes this is going to SLOW you down alot...

learn to play what you already know in several positions...

if you know what key your in ... transpose a fifth higher/fifth lower...go through the circle of fifths...go through as many keys as you can..

every chord you know how to play...learn the notes in it...learn the inversions...play them in as many positions as possible...

just a few ideas

yep..its work..not easy at first...

play well

wolf
#11
id say learn all your major and minor (natural, melodic, harmonic) scales up and down the single strings. that and working on sightreading helped me immensly with fretboard knowledge.
#12
Quote by martijndrift
Give the programm a try, it involves using your guitar as well...trust me, it uses multiple training methods, it really gets fast results, also trains your ears abit while you use it, sometimes a shortcut is the way to go


Well, thanks but I already know the notes on the fret-board. Method stated above.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 3, 2010,
#14
Quote by Tyler Durden
Learn it, dont memorize it - there is a difference

I already know how it works...

Thanks for the tips. I know how to read music in standard notation, but I take hours to play 3 notes I have one book only with simple musics in notation (for beginners) here with me, and I'm going to start training them.

Apart of that, I installed the program too and, so far, it seems really useful.

Thanks!
#15
Quote by Duarteman
I know how to read music in standard notation, but I take hours to play 3 notes


well, being proficient at it is what will help.

I admit that it's not an attractive option, hard work never is.

But it IS effective for your stated goals.
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by martijndrift
Give the programm a try, it involves using your guitar as well...trust me, it uses multiple training methods, it really gets fast results, also trains your ears abit while you use it, sometimes a shortcut is the way to go


shortcuts are called shortcuts for a reason. give the program a try if you want, but use it in conjunction with munky's methods. trust me - he knows what he's talking about.
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#17
i'd like to ask a question... at the moment i can figure the notes out in a relative sort of way, like i know the e and a string pretty well (because of barre chords) and i just use octave shapes to figure out d and g but it takes me a while. can you guys just pick any spot on the fretboard and instinctively know the note? cause that's what i'm aiming for and it'd be nice if i knew that was the 'norm'.
#18
Quote by Markus85
i'd like to ask a question... at the moment i can figure the notes out in a relative sort of way, like i know the e and a string pretty well (because of barre chords) and i just use octave shapes to figure out d and g but it takes me a while. can you guys just pick any spot on the fretboard and instinctively know the note? cause that's what i'm aiming for and it'd be nice if i knew that was the 'norm'.


Yup. I could name any note on the neck without hesitation.


Learning to read was the thing that made me really know the fret-board. You're constantly making associations with the notes your reading with where you're playing them on the guitar....... after awhile that sinks in quite well.

I couldn't do this until I had enough experience reading.


My experience is this..

shortcuts = fuzzy overview (not a bad start though)

reading proficiently in all positions = knowing the fretboard.
shred is gaudy music
#19
Quote by Markus85
i'd like to ask a question... at the moment i can figure the notes out in a relative sort of way, like i know the e and a string pretty well (because of barre chords) and i just use octave shapes to figure out d and g but it takes me a while. can you guys just pick any spot on the fretboard and instinctively know the note? cause that's what i'm aiming for and it'd be nice if i knew that was the 'norm'.

I almost can. Probably takes me a couple seconds for some notes, but ideally, you will be able to just know the notes.

The more you practice though, the more the notes on the fretboard will start to look like familiar faces in a room.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#20
can you guys just pick any spot on the fretboard and instinctively know the note? cause that's what i'm aiming for and it'd be nice if i knew that was the 'norm'.

That is the norm for every instrument but guitar. For some reason (because admitadly, guitar IS a hard instrument to read on and tablature is can be a logical way to understand fingerings) guitarists have just given up on reading--a huge part of being a proficient musician (unless your as talented and creative as jimi hendrix or wes montgomery, which few are) and playing in groups. The norm for a professional (or very advanced non professional) anything player is to be given music and to play it very well in time with a group. correct notes, rhythm, time, feel, dynamics and the player does not get lost. If you aspire to that and practice (learn the notes, spend time sightreading something that wont kill you every day) it will happen. Sightreading is one of the easiest (IMO) musical skills to develop at an advanced level as long as you work at it 20-30 minutes a day (much easier then alot of the technique so called virtousos like yngwie malmsteen use, and, much more useful for making music).