#1
Hi,

I can't seem to work out which key these chords belong in as neither belong together in my key table.

They are

G major, Cmajor, D major, Emajor.

Is this just G major with the Eminor chord exchanged for a major?

Thanks
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#2
Yep. G with and E major substituted in would be my guess just by looking at the chords.
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jun 3, 2010,
#3
It's G major.

Alot of people throw E major chord into various keys like G and C because it sounds alright.

I constantly find myself playing that E in A minor even though it technically doesnt fit.
#4
Quote by Funk Monk
It's G major.

Alot of people throw E major chord into various keys like G and C because it sounds alright.

I constantly find myself playing that E in A minor even though it technically doesnt fit.

Emaj in A minor is perfectly fine, its the v of a minor, and has a stronger pull to A at the end of a phrase. You use it with the raised 7th of harmonic minor ;D
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#5
Here are a couple of tips that may help....Although not etched in stone ,normally the last chord of the piece of music will be the key...EM in G is totally acceptable, in fact it is the relative minor of "G" major In the other post ref AM and EM they are also perfectly correct together Check out Dave Brubecks "Take 5: AM-EM.

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#7
i'd say G major with E major acting as V/ii (non-functioning, of course).
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#8
Quote by Eastwinn
I'd say it's in E Major.

How do you reach that conclusion?
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
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EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#9
Quote by hockeyplayer168
How do you reach that conclusion?
Although I don't agree with him I think he is recognizing the possible Picardy third in E minor.

Edit: Although he said E major.
Maybe he looked at it as a bunch of minor substitutions in a major key leading up to a Picardy third bringing it back into key.

Quote by AeolianWolf
i'd say G major with E major acting as V/ii (non-functioning, of course).
This seems most logical given no context. If there was a section before it in E major or E minor, then the Picardy third makes more sense.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jun 3, 2010,
#10
Without hearing it it could be in G major or E major. bVI bVII I isn't that uncommon in major keys. 'Kiss from a rose' by seal uses that progression, it's rather nice
#11
I assume then, that soloing over this could be a problem? You would have to remember to use the sharpened D arising from Emajor?
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#12
Quote by turtlewax
I assume then, that soloing over this could be a problem? You would have to remember to use the sharpened D arising from Emajor?



Jazz guitarists solo over key changes all the time, and would you even really have to dot hat with this progression?
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#13
Quote by griffRG7321
bVI bVII I isn't that uncommon in major keys. 'Kiss from a rose' by seal uses that progression, it's rather nice


This. This is exactly what it is and you can hear the resolution really well.

Soloing over this is easy, actually. It's a fake E minor progression -- just play E minor but avoid G over the E Major or use a G#. LOTS of Pearl Jam songs work exactly like this, including solos. Alive for example. Beyond solos, lots of Incubus songs have progressions like this too.
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