#1
My band recorded our first single yesterday at a recording studio and man was I nervous... I'm the lead guitarist/song writer in a technical melodic death metal band and each riff and solo in our songs are extremely complex. Even the producer told us he never recorded such a technical song in terms of guitar technique, and tempo changes (he's used to recording metalcore). I'm extremely used to the song though since I'm in charge of writing all the songs for our band, and in my many live gigs I hardly ever screw up, and when I do, it's a couple of notes max. This is why I was completely surprised when I sat down confident and ready to record and got unbelievably nervous when he hit the recording button. My second guitarist and singer seemed to keep calm and recorded their parts fairly quickly, yet, even though I made the song and am a tight player live and at practice it took me a hell of a while. I just kept screwing up the tempo, my riffs, and especially my solo. I felt so discouraged when my band members looked at me surprised and asked what was going on. All I could have said was that I was "freaking out". None of them seemed understanding and seemed to think that I just sucked, in spite of them constantly praising me live and at practice, and my bassist and drummer replaced in recording by the recording producer himself on bass and a drum machine...

Anyway, long story short, I eventually recorded everything well but it took a lot more takes and time than I expected. I just can't seem to focus and calm down when the producer hits the recording button. I felt so different than when I play live and my confidence was shot... I hope this doesn't happen again (we're recording an ep).

Anyone else here get nervous when recording? Any advice and tips you guys could give me on how to prepare/calm down?

Thanks
#2
anytime i record i get really nervous, i think its the pressure that what you do in the next couple of minutes could be what many people will judge you on.
Come listen to some of my songs:

My Music
#4
I don't get nervous, I just mess up. I mean I can play in front of ANY crowd MUCH better than in a studio alone
#5
I get nervous. The best way is to tell him to record, but not to tell you when he's recording and just play through songs a few times. You won't know which one he's recording so you shouldn't be as nervous.
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#6
Yeah I got nervous as hell aswell: luckily, my fellow guitarist did aswell, so it wasn't just me messing up.
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#8
I get like this. But it's 10 times worse live. If I have an audience of 2 or more people I get ridiculously nervous, I sweat a lot, and my hands start shaking.

Sweaty, shaking hands obviously isn't good for playing, and needless to say, I mess up a lot.
You're = You are
Your = Belongs to you

There = Not here
Their = Belongs to them
They're = They are
Thx.

Quote by Tim the Rocker
Good grammar is like sex. It feels good.
#9
Yeah, a couple of years ago when then my band & I first started to record, I was so nervous. Our sings weren't even technical at that point and I was still messing it up. It didn't help when my bass player was always saying "You're thinking too hard, just do it." And I was like, "If its that easy I would be doing it". Now I'm a lot more comfortable in the studio environment. I still get kind of anxious, but that's more of me being excited to record. So I think you'll get better as time goes on.
#10
I don't know if you guys record with a direct in or using an amp, but what I find helps me is if I can't hear myself play, or it's down very low so I can only hear the rest of the music. It makes me feel more confident about my playing while recording.
But ya I get that way live too. Especially if it's really really cold. My hands totally freeze up and I end up not being able to play fast enough.
And there came out of the smoke locusts upon the earth:
and unto them was given power, as the scorpions of the earth have power.
Revelations 9:3
Last edited by DiscoJomby at Jun 3, 2010,
#11
I usually drink a ton before recording so I don't give a shit. Also, since I play in a punk band, it doesn't matter if it sounds good, just if its loud and angry.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#12
Quote by DarkestChapter

Anyone else here get nervous when recording? Any advice and tips you guys could give me on how to prepare/calm down?

Thanks


I used to get really nervous when recording but that was when just starting out. These days I get pumped up and if there's a mistake I just move on and do another take later.
A few shots of whiskey or some wine usually helps me relax a little too but too much and you can't really stay on beat when you're a drummer...

Don't let the red light freak ya out, just think of it like a jam session.
Last edited by moody07747 at Jun 4, 2010,
#13
Yeah I was nervous at first even when I was just recording myself on my own. Same as with playing live, you just get used to it after a few times.

Don't worry about it
Quote by Liberation
Every time I see your avatar I want to slit your neck with a butterknife. Goddamn Pingu.
#14
It happens, and thats why I don't play shows. I just jam with my friends. I don't like the weight to be shifted on me at any point. I don't want to feel obligated to preform.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
Taylor 214ce - 10
#15
Whoa, I did not expect that many people feeling the same as I do when recording. Makes me feel better, lol. I guess it's kind of a normal experience, but it's still frustrating to say the least. I think I'll try alcohol next time, and see if it helps. It used to calm me down for gigs, so it might work. I think band members play a large part though. Especially if they continue to stick around while you're recording, which is added pressure.

I personally find recording a lot more anxiety provoking than playing live with a band though. Atleast live you aren't alone (if you're in a band) and the focus isn't much on you. You could also get away with a couple of screw ups without anyone noticing. Recording though, you're all alone, and every note you screw up is just another waste of time and money.

I just hope I end up getting used to it fast, before my band's ep is done, and not tense up everytime. Maybe with experience...
#16
ask the engineer if you can get the session from him to take home if you have a wee setup just practice recording it
jackson dk2 2008
hamer xt sunburst qt
epiphone g400
peavey vk212
morley p wah
behringer pb1000
dige bm
big muff ny
behringer dc 9 comp
member of the Jackson/Charvel Owners Club

£8.50/58fund for a ROCKTRON HUSH SUPER C PEDAL
#17
Alcohol is what I use to loosin me up when recording. Not too much tho just a couple beers or a few shots. Helps a lot to just to get your head right and it sets the mode to throw it down and forget about everything else goin on, kinda like just getting in the zone.
My Music
-Leave a rating, comment with link will C4C-
#18
The best and only working solution is to get more experience recording. Record yourself playing at home, everyday, do it over and over. I used to be extremely stressed out when recording, that all went away after doing it non stop for a week when I was recording for my band. Now I don't even think twice about it.
#19
sounds like me. I take forever to record stuff because i want it to be perfect. one flubbed note and i re-do it. I think its because of that, i get in that mode wherei can't make one mistake and put way to much pressure on myself.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#20
Just go in and do it. Don't think about the situation or anything. Just look at your guitar and play.

I was that way when I first started playing in front of people. My leg would start shaking, and then I'd mess up the rhythm of the guitar, so I'd lose my vocals. Then i finally said, "Screw this, I have no reason to give a damn what they think" and voila! I stopped shaking.
#21
I get nervous sometimes if I'm called by a friend to do some session work or something, not so much when I'm working on my own material.

Quote by eXperiment63
Just go in and do it. Don't think about the situation or anything. Just look at your guitar and play.

I was that way when I first started playing in front of people. My leg would start shaking, and then I'd mess up the rhythm of the guitar, so I'd lose my vocals. Then i finally said, "Screw this, I have no reason to give a damn what they think" and voila! I stopped shaking.


Playing in the studio is much more nerve wracking than just playing in front of people though, not only are you trying to play the definitive version of your song, but every screw up that you make has to be fixed later (or you have to record the track again) which, of course costs money that a lot of people can't really afford to waste. Remember, live screw ups only last a second then it's over, recorded screw ups last forever.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jun 5, 2010,
#23
After years of recording and the ability in the digital world to cut and paste, I find that I always plan to record each track three time without stoping to listen to what I just did. The first track will have a few clams, the second feels better and the third one is usually the best. The trick is to not change any of the settings on the recorder or the amp, Then you have three tracks to pick from and let the cut and paste begin. I find this always puts the performer a little more at ease, knowing that you can make a mistake without having to stop and start over. Just be sure to turn off each of the recorded tracks as you go.
#24
Quote by Larsyn
After years of recording and the ability in the digital world to cut and paste, I find that I always plan to record each track three time without stoping to listen to what I just did. The first track will have a few clams, the second feels better and the third one is usually the best. The trick is to not change any of the settings on the recorder or the amp, Then you have three tracks to pick from and let the cut and paste begin. I find this always puts the performer a little more at ease, knowing that you can make a mistake without having to stop and start over. Just be sure to turn off each of the recorded tracks as you go.

For anyone using Logic, it's even easier. Set 'track comping' on, or whatever the official option is, and then just record and re-record again and again, and when you're finished unpack the comp takes and select the best bits/take etc.

Oh, and to add my own input... I find it helps if you take the time to relax beforehand and make sure you're comfortable before you start. You're not gonna get good takes if you're partially thinking about that ache in your back from how you're sitting, or how you can't move too much because the chain on your neck might hit the guitar strings etc.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jun 5, 2010,
#25
I record a lot of my practice sessions - usually there will be some great takes in the sessions that I can cut out. Once you get relaxed and keep playing some great stuff comes out...
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#26
Quote by Larsyn
After years of recording and the ability in the digital world to cut and paste, I find that I always plan to record each track three time without stoping to listen to what I just did. The first track will have a few clams, the second feels better and the third one is usually the best. The trick is to not change any of the settings on the recorder or the amp, Then you have three tracks to pick from and let the cut and paste begin. I find this always puts the performer a little more at ease, knowing that you can make a mistake without having to stop and start over. Just be sure to turn off each of the recorded tracks as you go.


yea with modern digital gear its so easy to overdub parts or chop up the best parts of 3 or more takes of a track. That's what I tend to do.
#27
Quote by moody07747
yea with modern digital gear its so easy to overdub parts or chop up the best parts of 3 or more takes of a track. That's what I tend to do.


Pfft, its not really a new thing but its defiantly gotten easier as time has gone on.

I mean the 2nd solo of Pink Floyd's Comfortably Numb was literally 5 solos spliced together into what it is now.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp