#1
Hey guys, I have a quick question...

I have been learning accoustic (classical) guitar for almost 6 years now. I picked up the electric guitar at around 2 to 3 years ago. My question is did classical guitar help me in any way? I dont feel like it did. When I transitioned over I did not have any problems that a beginer would have had but I wasn't a beginer anyway. I would quit classical guitar as it has little venue other than posting videos on youtube when I have something down. But I am not able to because my father insists that I continue Classical guitar. How does it help me?

Thanks.
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#2
I wouldn't say totally abandon it. Lots of guitarists have adopted various techniques and ideas from classical guitar over into the electric guitardom. Try it yourself if you like.
#3
The only real benefit I can think of is better dexterity. Normally what you would be playing on an acoustic, or classical, guitar would be either chords or finger style. I started on electric in the beginning and didnt get an acoustic until after about 2 years of playing electric. Immediately after I started learning the basic chords and positions and playing finger style I noticed an Improvement in my electric playing. I'd have to agree with your pep pep though, stick with the acoustic. If your getting bored playing it try learning some songs with tapping and percussion played on the body of the guitar such as Drifting by Andy McKee.
#4
Classical music is good to understand the foundations of music theory and composition. It teaches you good technique, you learn how to master very challenging music, and you actually learn how to read sheet music for guitar. I think knowing all this greatly enhances your overall musical abilities, your understanding of music and your chances of ever becoming a music teacher or professional musician. I wouldn't recommend quitting it entirely, but it is also good to broaden your styles beyond just classical as well.
#5
I took a couple years of classical guitar when I first started learning and it has helped my:

Fingerpicking skills
Composition skills
Keeping a tempo without drummer/metronome
Finger flexibility
Picking dynamics
Chord/scales nomenclature
Memorizing the fretboard
Sight reading staff music

If you think that is useless then I don't know what to tell you.
#8
Acoustic guitar gives a completely different sound than an electric (kind of obviouse). I play both, and even though I like electric better, there are some songs that you can't really play on an electric.
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#9
Have you played anything besides "standard" classical pieces? For example, have you done any Beatles, Clapton, etc. arranged for a classical Guitar? What about country blues? You might just need to find something you would like to play.
#10
why not.
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#11
it would have helped somewhat with your guitar playing, as you do learn some good things from classical guitar. as for giving it up or not, don't let your dad control your decisions. Mine tried to make me a lead guitarist (I do the occasional leads now) but I wasn't really enjoying it as much as I was playing Rythm guitar. If you want to give up classical, then just tell your dad that it is your life, and you can make your own decisions.
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#12
In my opinion the classic acoustic guitar way better developed your fingers (of both hands) and helps you analysis the music at all. Only at acoustic i have understood what means whole step and 1/2 step.
If you going to be great guitar player you need to know mechanix of both guitars but if this just you`r hobby or something you can ask you`re self :"does i`m really need to practice on acoustic if i dont want it ?".
You`re father doesnt right in this case but still hi is your father and you need to respect his order or just talk with him about "why you want this?".
Good luck.
#13
Benefit?

Are we all forgetting about tone?

Classical Guitar is almost a whole different instrument of it's own, and it's very arrogant to say it's only used for Youtube. That ideological nonsense could be applied to every instrument.

If you don't like playing Classical, DON'T.
#14
Quote by JayLacelle
I took a couple years of classical guitar when I first started learning and it has helped my:

Fingerpicking skills
Composition skills
Keeping a tempo without drummer/metronome
Finger flexibility
Picking dynamics
Chord/scales nomenclature
Memorizing the fretboard
Sight reading staff music

If you think that is useless then I don't know what to tell you.


This pretty much sums it up.
#15
I played classical guitar for an entire year before I picked up an electric and made the transition immediately (other than using the pick). I do notice a big difference when I play both classical and electric, especially in my electric playing ability. Never understood why but my fingering and technique is always better if I keep up the classical playing! Not to mention musical theory and interpretation... Ah I've just read some of the above posts... Basically what they have said!
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#16
Classical Guitar is almost a whole different instrument of it's own, and it's very arrogant to say it's only used for Youtube. That ideological nonsense could be applied to every instrument.


I meant that I would only be using it for that. I didn't mean that this was its only purpose. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
Learning the guitar one note at a time.


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Remember that subscriptions and constructive feedback is always helpfull.
#17
if you've been taking classical lessons for 6 years, how's your classical playing? it seems to me that most of the benefit you'd get from playing classical would have already happened by now. do you know a bunch of the standard classical tunes? can you play them with dynamics and good timing?

seems like after 6 years, you certainly would know if you want to play that style of guitar or not. your father has something in mind that probably doesn't apply to you. i didn't like playing classical music, and it took me a year to convince my parents of this. if you're living at home, there's probably not much you can do about it unless your father is willing to listen, but be sure to also play the kind of music you like so guitar will be something you enjoy rather than just a chore.
#18
Accoustic guitar is a good way to get started, so I'd sya keep playing accoustic and electric.
#19
Am I the only one who gets annoyed when the word 'acoustic' gets misspelled?
#20
no, you're not the only one.

ever see threads where people spell google "goggle"? drives me up a fricking wall!

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Am I the only one who gets annoyed when the word 'acoustic' gets misspelled?
#21
It seems to have helped Chris Broderick quite a bit. Plus, being a classical guitar player is an impressive talent in its own righ.
#22
Back to the original topic...honestly, what's the reason to *not* learn acoustic guitar? There are the obvious benefits like impressing chicks, making good music, etc., but it just makes you a more well-rounded and interesting person in general.
#24
I'd keep going with your Classical lessons if I were you. I understand that a lot of the pieces that you're working with might not seem hip at all, and even like a complete waste of time. But, you're getting solid lessons, and if it's through school, you're getting practice playing with a whole band. Soak it up. If you think it's lame, suck it up and get back to soaking it up. That's my advice.
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#25
play some sweet acoustic tunes.

and then wow the ladies with your abilities.

and yes, there is a double meaning there.
#26
Classical guitar helps you in the reasons everyone else has mentioned. Especially after six years of it, I'd imagine your technique is VERY good, whereas a lot of guitarists you see in popular music are doing all sorts of things 'wrong'. Plus, if you ever wanted to study music in college, you've got a good classical background to get you in. Classical also helps with a better understanding of music, and an ability to read sheet music. I'd say being able to read music is a big plus.

If you're looking for something new though, I'd say try to find a jazz band to play in; that's an experience of it's own. For guitar, it really tests your knowledge of chords and chord shapes and how to alter them, and it tests your ability of improvisation.

Or perhaps try a new form of acoustic guitar? If you can find yourself a nice steel-string, you could learn some acoustic fingerstyle pieces (IE Andy Mckee, Antoine Dufour, etc) or bluegrass or whatever. A lot of stuff like Nickel Creek and punch brothers has some pretty challenging stuff in it.
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