#1
Alright so I have whats in my Sig, and I plan on recording riffs with my Champ 600.
I want to make sure I have a decent mic that can capture that awesome tube sound. Id also like some type of computer interface card, where I can record riffs and mix them, ect ect.
The simpler the better, im technically proficient, but I like things easy.

1. So a good mic(pref one that can plug into my PA and PC)
2. PC interface card
3. Maybe some good software thats easy to use?
Price doesn't really matter I guess.....(hopefully not over $400)
Any suggestions with details would be great. Thanks in advance dudes.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
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Taylor 214ce - 10
Last edited by teamhex at Jun 3, 2010,
#2
For a 100 bucks you can go and rent some studio time. You can't get "a good mic" and a PC interface for a hundred.
#3
Come back when you have $220 and we'll talk
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#4
Price isnt really a big deal I just said that so people dont send me $1000 dollar setups. If $220 is whats needed then $220 it is.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
Taylor 214ce - 10
Last edited by teamhex at Jun 3, 2010,
#6
So why do I need the monitors?
Iv got a 5.1 hooked up to my rig. It is for audio lag reasons?
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
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#7
No, its because your 5.1 speakers don't have a neutral EQ. Most home speakers (especially 5.1 sets and I'm going to assume this is a gaming set) have certain frequencies that are boosted so that you can hear them more clearly (usually, the bass is boosted and the highs are a little boosted on them). With monitor speakers, the EQ curve is completely flat (or nearly flat). You want this when mixing music and recording audio.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#8
Quote by lockwolf
No, its because your 5.1 speakers don't have a neutral EQ. Most home speakers (especially 5.1 sets and I'm going to assume this is a gaming set) have certain frequencies that are boosted so that you can hear them more clearly (usually, the bass is boosted and the highs are a little boosted on them). With monitor speakers, the EQ curve is completely flat (or nearly flat). You want this when mixing music and recording audio.


So with this and a program ill be able to record while listening to say....an mp3, then throw my track onto that mp3? If anyone knows of some good software for noobs getting into recording please let me know.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
Taylor 214ce - 10
#9
Get a decent USB interface, Usually comes with some kind of software like Cubase LE. Then get a decent mic (condenser mics your interface will need phantom power). Then some goodish headphones. Then add as you need.


^yes, you can then do pretty much anything!
Studio monitors are not really necessary IMO when starting out. They pretty much suck for listening to music on, but later, if you want to do serious mixing by yourself, they are a necessity.

It's best to have both dynamic and condenser mics, but really condenser can be more versatile for vocals, acoustic etc.
Last edited by Tempoe at Jun 6, 2010,
#10
Quote by Tempoe
Get a decent USB interface, Usually comes with some kind of software like Cubase LE. Then get a decent condenser mic (your interface will need phantom power). Then some goodish headphones. Then add as you need.


^yes, you can then do pretty much anything!
Studio monitors are not really necessary IMO when starting out. They pretty much suck for listening to music on, but later, if you want to do serious mixing by yourself, they are a necessity.

Im not that hardcore into it, id like to be able to hit record and play for like 30 minutes. Iv also got some great quality blues backing tracks that I want to record guitar over. Maybe ill get into recording and mixing a bit. I just dont know the first thing about it.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
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#11
if you want to record guitar you are going to need:

Shure SM57 microphone

and if you want to make an investment and learn about recording and mixing then get a digidesign/avid MBOX 2 MINI all the I/O you will need

this is the most basic setup you can get without compromise, and you will learn alot.
#13
Quote by MickoLX
no you wouldnt, Mbox 2 MINI dude, thats the interface. it has a mic input.

wow, mate you need to do some reading,

dynamic, condenser, theres no "better" mic, dynamics have different uses to condensers.

you chuck a condenser infront of your speaker and its going to sound like crap coz they have a slow(er) transient response than a dynamic. your putting a mic infornt of a speaker thats pushing a shitload of air, fast, dynamic can handle a higher SPL. which is another reason condensers dont work well with amps, but work great on acoustics

SM57 is a STANDARD guitar amp recording microphone, its also a STANDARD snare drum mic

i suggest you use your money and book time in a proper studio before you go out and buy things... you will learn alot by just being their and watching the engineer setup and track your playing.

I dont have anything to record. Its not like I write stuff. I just want to dick around. The Studio isnt really something im interested in. Either way man ill figure something out. I copied and pasted the sentence pulled up something different so.....Thanks for the input dudes

I think im going to go with the SM57
and maybe an interface like this
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Line-6-TonePort-UX1-USB-Recording-Modeling-Interface-103373676-i1126366.gc
or
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Lexicon-Alpha-USB-Desktop-Recording-Studio-103840849-i1126259.gc

I'm wondering if it will work though. It doesn't have the phantom power thing, but do I need that for that SM57?
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
Taylor 214ce - 10
Last edited by teamhex at Jun 5, 2010,
#14
Quote by MickoLX

you chuck a condenser infront of your speaker and its going to sound like crap coz they have a slow(er) transient response than a dynamic. your putting a mic infornt of a speaker thats pushing a shitload of air, fast, dynamic can handle a higher SPL. which is another reason condensers dont work well with amps, but work great on acoustics


I wouldn't say consdensers DON'T work well with amps. I have a set of Shure condensers and a set of dynamic SM57s. I use both on cabs depending on what sound I'm going for. I can get both to sound great on a cab and both to sound equally horrible depending on how I place them.

Recording is all about experimentation. Its just as much science as art.

EDIT:

To original poster: No you don't need phantom power for Dynamic microphones.
#15
Quote by MickoLX
and if you want to make an investment and learn about recording and mixing then get a digidesign/avid MBOX 2 MINI all the I/O you will need


No, they aren't. Those things are joke. No Midi = Major problems

This thread should have died down sometime after I said "Get this"
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#16
Quote by MickoLX
no you wouldnt, Mbox 2 MINI dude, thats the interface. it has a mic input.

wow, mate you need to do some reading,

dynamic, condenser, theres no "better" mic, dynamics have different uses to condensers.

you chuck a condenser infront of your speaker and its going to sound like crap coz they have a slow(er) transient response than a dynamic. your putting a mic infornt of a speaker thats pushing a shitload of air, fast, dynamic can handle a higher SPL. which is another reason condensers dont work well with amps, but work great on acoustics

SM57 is a STANDARD guitar amp recording microphone, its also a STANDARD snare drum mic

i suggest you use your money and book time in a proper studio before you go out and buy things... you will learn alot by just being their and watching the engineer setup and track your playing.

You, sir, have a lot to learn about professional recording before you start shouting others down and saying what is 'right' and 'wrong'.

Firstly, plenty of people record with condensers and get a perfectly usable sound, including myself if the moment calls for it. There is no 'right' or 'wrong' mic for any situation, only 'different' mics to gain different properties.

Yes, a dynamic can handle high SPL's but there are plenty of other dynamics to the SM57 (or SM58-with-the-wind-shield-off); the T-Bone '57 clone is almost identical in sound to the Shure namesake, to all but the best of engineers' ears for a start. I prefer the sound of an AKG414 on a cab for a metal sound, than a 57 or similar.

Also, dynamics suffer from the proximity effect and if you are mic'ing up a big, beefy Mesa 4x12 in an untreated room for a punchy metal tone you may find the proximity effect on a 57 overpowering, and end up having to move the mic back (in some cases, resulting in a more distant sound, with more of the room reflections).

Finally, as long as the SPL isn't too high from the source signal, ribbon mics can actually be incredibly detailed and in some respects are the 'purest' way to record sound (in terms of signal path etc.) so don't rule them out either just because they can't handle the same SPL as a dynamic mic.


Edit: Oh, and I've always found the MBOX range a bit of a rip-off to be honest, and if it weren't for the now bundled Pro Tools software, even if it is a poor man's Pro Tools, I wouldn't even consider recommending them to anyone.

And I'm not going to claim to know everything about sound engineering, but then I didn't come to this thread thinking I knew enough to tell people their advice was rubbish (except maybe some of yours ), and at least I understand that whilst I am doing a degree in Sound Engineering & Production at the number 1 university for media (I believe) in the UK, I am not a professional and do not know everything.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jun 5, 2010,
#18
Quote by teamhex
Whew...you guys really love your audio.
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-SM57-X2U-SM57-MIC-WITH-XLR-TO-USB-PACKAGE-872909-i1447405.gc
I'm just going to go with this if I can find it. I figure if the mic is as awesome as everyone says, then this interface must be at least half as awesome.


Its not. 99% of the time, the XLR to USB converters are terrible. Its basically the same as plugging the mic into your mic port but without the risk of blowing your sound card.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#19
Quote by lockwolf
Its not. 99% of the time, the XLR to USB converters are terrible. Its basically the same as plugging the mic into your mic port but without the risk of blowing your sound card.

Well I bought the sm57 and the interface you told me to get. They work great. I had to re-format my laptop and go back to XP to use it, but none the less great.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional - 11
Fender Stratocaster MIM - 04
Fender Mustang - 04
Taylor 214ce - 10