#1
Hey guys, I'm just starting out with vocals. Complete beginner.
I just have a feeling my vocal range is awful, even for a starter.

Excluding falsetto I am A3 to D4

What are your thoughts UG?
#2
Your range is probably much larger, but haven't learn to access the parts outside your comfort range (the range where you speak normally). Go to a singing teacher and ask them to find your range.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
^ Agreed. Most people have roughly a two-octave range. Rarely much more and rarely much less. NOT including falsetto.

If a singer says he has a three octave or more range, they're usually either lying or are not measuring their range properly.

If a singer has a one-octave range, they are merely limiting their voice by poor production technique. You almost surely DO have those two octaves. How you produce your voice is, in 99% of cases, the limiting factor that prevents you from achieving that.

As Alan suggested, get a vocal instructor who will teach you technique.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Thank you guys,
a bit short on cash at the moment so an instructor may have to wait a month or so.
But if technique is really putting that much of a bottleneck on my voice then I'm gonna get that son of a mother sorted
#5
All great advice.

Quote by axemanchris
If a singer has a one-octave range, they are merely limiting their voice by poor production technique. You almost surely DO have those two octaves. How you produce your voice is, in 99% of cases, the limiting factor that prevents you from achieving that.
To add on to that, it probably has to do with your resonance and support. It's absolutely essential that your resonance is NOT in your throat. I feel this may be the case with you. Do you feel strained when you are near the bottom or top of your range? Also, you may not have proper diaphragm support (but not pushing with the diaphragm, just using it as support). This is an issue with how you breathe and how you use the muscles other than the vocal chords, as they are just as important as the chords themselves.

If you could post a video/audio clip of you singing we might be able to help you out a bit.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by food1010
All great advice.

To add on to that, it probably has to do with your resonance and support. It's absolutely essential that your resonance is NOT in your throat. I feel this may be the case with you. Do you feel strained when you are near the bottom or top of your range? Also, you may not have proper diaphragm support (but not pushing with the diaphragm, just using it as support). This is an issue with how you breathe and how you use the muscles other than the vocal chords, as they are just as important as the chords themselves.

If you could post a video/audio clip of you singing we might be able to help you out a bit.



Yes I do feel the strain, it's like I'm having to push harder to reach the notes.
I'll try and record a clip for you later on today.

Thank you.
#7
Quote by Corko93
Yes I do feel the strain, it's like I'm having to push harder to reach the notes.


One of the weird things about "the strain" is that it's largely a mental block there, coupled with the bad technique. You believe you can't sing that high, so you can't, or try to force it, which is bad at any tone.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
I had less than an octave's range when I started not counting falsetto, now I have almost 2 and a half (though only 2 is really useful).
Some of us just start out with really shitty ranges, especially if you only tried to sing after puberty. It'll improve over time though, and I'd really recommend a good teacher.
#9
Quote by AlanHB
One of the weird things about "the strain" is that it's largely a mental block there, coupled with the bad technique. You believe you can't sing that high, so you can't, or try to force it, which is bad at any tone.
I've never really thought of it that way, but that's sounds about right.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
TS, did you ever play a wind instrument? Its the EXACT same concept for producing tone on say a trumpet and with your voice. Deep breaths that fill from the bottom up, and keep the tone out of your throat. For high notes, use a lot of air and let the note happen; if you force it, it sounds like shit. We all know what happens when a trumpet player tries to force out high notes