#1
What would be the best way for two guitarists/ one guitarist and bassist with possibly vocals and drums to record to mp3? I have no idea about mini recorders or computer mp3 recorders so any info would be great
#3
Quote by canihasbucket
don't record to mp3, record to something lossless then convert to mp3 for distribution


Don't all converters cost money? If so how much? I converted when i was younger and this annoying voice ad played every two seconds.

Thanks for the quick post though! :P
#4
most recording programs let you export to mp3, but I think hes trying to say don't record raw audio in mp3 format. But dont worry about that. Most if not all recording programs record as WAV or an otherwise suitable format. Also, See the threads at the top of this forum, all the information is there.
#5
I'm a noob to recording. I'm asking which is the best way to record? And how do i go about doing it? For example should i buy one of those Boss Micros or buy computer software??
#7
Well, first what's your budget?

Do you think you would rather record one track at a time, or the whole band simultaneously?

What level of quality are you looking for?

Whats the end goal for these recordings? Just to hear yourselves play and self-critique it or make CDs or a demo?
#8
Quote by saint22
Well, first what's your budget?

Do you think you would rather record one track at a time, or the whole band simultaneously?

What level of quality are you looking for?

Whats the end goal for these recordings? Just to hear yourselves play and self-critique it or make CDs or a demo?


Thanks for the post! Budgetwise, i suppose up to £100 but something cheaper would be good. If your not in the UK you could use a converter to find how much that amount is in your currency.. I have no idea for euros or US dollars as the exchange rate is in meltdown at the moment.

The whole band simultaneously would be best to capture any creative sparks but track by track would be okay if it were easy enough to use..

The end goal is mainly to hear our sound from a new point of view. Also to post mp3s on sites like this to get other people's opinion.

I hope you can reply to this, thanks man!
#9
The Statements

Quote by Jed121
Budgetwise, i suppose up to £100 but something cheaper would be good.


and

The whole band simultaneously would be best to capture any creative sparks


Won't happen. You really cant get anything for under £100 that will let you properly record a drumkit.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
Ok, I thought I had replied to this, but I guess not. Or UG just glitched or something.

Anyways, lockwolf is right, I don't know exactly how much that is in USD but you really won't be able to get more than a one or two input interface for that. And that's still no microphone, so you'd be able to do guitars and bass, direct-in one, or maybe two at a time, but that's it. Another 100 USD or so will get you a decent mic. The trouble there is that first, one mic isn't really enough to properly record drums, and if you get a good vocal mic, it won't be great for rums and vice versa.

My advice is keep saving. When you've got 800-1000 USD to spend, do some research and come on back with any questions. In the meantime, keep practicing and really know your stuff forwards and backwards. All the aspects of recording and infinitely easier if you can play your parts exactly right without having to think about it.
#11
Quote by lockwolf
The Statements


and


Won't happen. You really cant get anything for under £100 that will let you properly record a drumkit.


Yes it will happen. You can buy an rb500 ribbon mic for about 80quid and stick that a good few feet away from the kit in a decent sounding room and you can get a good sound. A lot of old recordings didn't use many mics on drums and you often had a decent sound. (older rolling stones and a few led zep songs were done with 1 or two mics on the kit)

Obviously in a perfect world we'd all have more mics to use but for recording on a budget it's wrong to say you can't get good sounds on a drum kit with limited stuff.


Also yeah i have used the rb500 so i'm not just talking bs.
#12
Thats a good point to make. No, you don't need every piece mic'd up. You do need a decent sounding room though. And do you think the rb500 would work well for vocals/micing cabs? I'm not too familiar with ribbon mics.
#13
Thanks, Boss Micro BR looks pretty good. Cheap and made by Boss.. Aparently the built in mic sucks but of course it will. You can plug a better mic in anyway.

Any opinions on the Boss Micro ?
#14
I never used a multi-track recorder like that, everything i've done has used a DAW. For the price of the Boss, you could buy a cheap interface and mic, download Reaper which is more or less free, and I think that would work a lot better for you.

If you're just looking to use these recordings to listen to you band for self-critique purposes, you can hang the mic in the middle of the room (mess around with distances from amps and drums and all that to balance the volume as best you can). DISCLAIMER: before i get flamed, I'm not saying this will produce high quality recordings, but it can be sufficient for recording band practice.

If you're looking to make some mp3s to put online, you can record track-by-track and start learning the great art of mixing. Thats a whole 'nother subject that there are enough books to fill a library so I'm not going to get into that here. Yeah the drums will be tough with only one mic, but it'll be doable. The advantage of using an interface and DAW for this is that each part will be on its own track so you'll be able to do more with it post-tracking than you could with the boss micro.
#15
Quote by saint22
Thats a good point to make. No, you don't need every piece mic'd up. You do need a decent sounding room though. And do you think the rb500 would work well for vocals/micing cabs? I'm not too familiar with ribbon mics.


Oh yeah a good room is very helpful when you've only got one mic to pick up all the drum kit because that room sound can really reinforce the sound.

Well i've used the rb500 at college on guitar amps and vocals. It can take a hell of a lot of sound levels for a ribbon mic (just don't put it inside a kick drum or whatever). It would be more suited to doing vocals than an sm58 would because ribbons are generally more sensetive on vocals and you get quite a good sound on guitar speakers too. It's a figure of 8 polar pattern (front and back) so potential dampening of the back side of the mic may be important if you don't want room ambience.

I think for the price that would be decent on drums, i recently did a drum recording with just two sm58s though and got a good sound (i'm currently mixing them for a project) but that would work out at around £140 whereas the rb500 is about 80 or 90 (i think).

But yeah, when recording with few mics the room becomes almost an instrument in itself because a good sounding room will add a lot to the recording.

edit: Also, when recording drums with one mic try a few positions and listen back. I've always found that about 6 feet away pointing slightly down to the top of the kick drum is a good one.
Last edited by Zoot Allures at Jun 8, 2010,