#1
So, i've been playing for 2 years and I consider myself an intermediate guitar player, and I wana learn how to play blues but I dunno from where to start from O_o. What songs do u recommend?
#2
12 bar blues
blues scale
use bends

=instant blues
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#3
what have you been playing for 2 years? since every rock has got roots in blues? punk,shred or some death?
#4
i suggest searching some lessons on the 12 bar blues, and blues turnarounds.

that should get you started on the rhythm playing, and use the blues scale for soloing
#5
Look at players like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, BB King, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck. Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and Joe Bonamassa are all great listening as well.

Blues is singing music. When soloing, play what you would sing, feel the music in any way you can. Don't half arse it, pour every part of your person into it, and it will show.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#6
Don't forget to listen to Peter Green and Gary Moore. Then there's John Mayall, whose vocal timing is among the best and leaves lovely spaces for guitar to fill in.
There are several blues backing compilations around on the 'net which are good for improvising in different blues styles.
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#7
try the wind cries mary by jimi hendrix its fairly easy song to learn and doesnt go fro like 7min
#8
All the above artists are generations removed from the roots of the blues. I'd suggest firing up YouTube and checking out the large number of videos of the masters that originated the style.
Listen to Muddy, Son House, Elmore James, Howlin' Wolf....Yadda, yaada. Each video will link you to a dozen others... Get a feel for the raw emotion these seminal bluesmen put out and then try to capture this for yourself.
#9
Quote by Bikewer
All the above artists are generations removed from the roots of the blues. I'd suggest firing up YouTube and checking out the large number of videos of the masters that originated the style.
Listen to Muddy, Son House, Elmore James, Howlin' Wolf....Yadda, yaada. Each video will link you to a dozen others... Get a feel for the raw emotion these seminal bluesmen put out and then try to capture this for yourself.


Sure, but they're not really accessable, which i imagine is what TS is after. Best to start at more easy to listen to blues then work your way back IMO. Something about the old recordings seems to put newcomers to blues off the music.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#10
Hard to imagine these artists not being "accessible".....Most of this material is rather primitive, structurally. Straightforward 3-chord 12-bar stuff.
Blues is much more about feeling and intensity than it is about chops. Sometimes the lyrics can be a little difficult to understand, but you can always find lyrics on the web.

All these guys were the seminal influences for the British blues invasion of the 60s... Mayall, Clapton, Greene, the Stones, early Fleetwood Mac...On and on.
#11
John Mayall's blues breakers. His guitarists included Eric Clapton then Mick Taylor after Clapton left, arguably some of the best blues based guitarists of their time.

Mick Taylor went on to play with the Rolling Stones from 69-74/75ish'
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