#1
I've come up with soooo many songs that are kind of like.. well I don't know the genre but they're similar to like The Strokes. I don't know what it is. I try to create some
heavy metal energetic stuff and for some reason the riffs and notes form into a totally different genre.

Can you take an original riff and morph it into different genres?
If so how would I go about doing it?

It would be kind of cool hearing the same riff played in different genres.

EDIT: Crap I'm not sure if this goes in the right forum.
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Last edited by Phazon at Jun 6, 2010,
#2
Just muck about with tempo and accenting maybe. Change little things. I dunno, I can't write at all



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#3
Write riffs/melodies in your head and then figure them out on the guitar, rather than just writing what comes out when your hands go into auto mode.
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#5
Quote by 18th_Angel
Write riffs/melodies in your head and then figure them out on the guitar, rather than just writing what comes out when your hands go into auto mode.

^ This.

Think with your mind, not fingers.
#6
Devil's Tritone, mother****er!

But if you want, starting out and going to Drop D is an insanely easy way to write heavy stuff. I started with Drop D and just got comfortable with messing around, then started with Standard. Anything sounds heavy in Drop D.

And when you're learning covers, take notice of the way the songs are put together musically.
❝Don't be afraid of death, but of an inadequate life❞
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#7
Try learning riffs from bands you like in that genre. Then try improv-ing in thoses riffs. Once you start hearing stuff you like that is part yours-part theirs, then try your own staying true to the styling of the metal genre (stacatos, accents, etc)

yeah get the sound in your head then try your thing then go for it.
Last edited by Haustinj at Jun 6, 2010,
#8
Learn some theory. I'm not trying to be a smart arse btw.

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#9
Too many bands are playing generic boring stagnant metal. Playing indie riffs in metal songs could turn out kinda cool, if nothing else it'd be different.
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#10
Quote by KirkMetallica
Devil's Tritone, mother****er!

But if you want, starting out and going to Drop D is an insanely easy way to write heavy stuff. I started with Drop D and just got comfortable with messing around, then started with Standard. Anything sounds heavy in Drop D.

And when you're learning covers, take notice of the way the songs are put together musically.

Drop D, FUCK YEAH!

hello
#14
Quote by KirkMetallica
Devil's Tritone, mother****er!

But if you want, starting out and going to Drop D is an insanely easy way to write heavy stuff. I started with Drop D and just got comfortable with messing around, then started with Standard. Anything sounds heavy in Drop D.

And when you're learning covers, take notice of the way the songs are put together musically.

Don't ever tell someone who's learning to write to use drop d. Don't take this advice, usually the use of drop d early on leads to dependency on the ease of the tuning, and the "heaviness" of it(which can be easily recreated on a guitar tuned standard once you can write heavy music well)which will make you a lesser player of sorts, but try it once you're really comfortable with metal rhythm parts and writing metal rhythm parts. However, the devils tritone is a good idea. I heard someone say think of what you want then figure it out. I think that's a good idea. It possible to make another riff sound like another genre, but you have to know the common techniques of the genre to do it. I'll just list some things to know to do in metal: Gallops(Like in battery, or the reverse kind like in raining blood), palm muting, hammer ons/pull offs, tremolo picking. Those are some basic things to experiment with. Also the 4th(In the key of E, this note is Ab) degree of the blues scale is a good note to give emphasis to, as it is the third degree in the E diminished scale(the first being E, and the second being G), which gives things a worried, energetic, and often times, evil feel. The use of minor scales(Natural minor, harmonic minor, minor blues, diminished, and so on) is essential. Listen to metal often, specifically the sort of metal you wanna get the sound of. Those are all things that helped me.
Last edited by Dio10101 at Jun 6, 2010,
#15
Quote by opc100
Drop D, FUCK YEAH!



And what is wrong with Drop D?

Edit: ^Ah. Well, I like drop D.
❝Don't be afraid of death, but of an inadequate life❞
Bertolt Bretcht


Last edited by KirkMetallica at Jun 6, 2010,
#16
Quote by KirkMetallica
And what is wrong with Drop D?

Nothing. Unless the tuning is abused. It can lead to dependency, which takes away from musicianship, and people won't really know how to play without it(not always but occasionally) and they won't be able to write heavy riffs without it. Nothin is wrong with it, as long as it isn't abused and overused(not always but occasionally). Drop tunings can be both good and bad.
#17
Yeah don't worry I refuse to play in drop D no matter how awesome the riffs are.
I mostly play real heavy metal so i find it strange that everything I come up with sounds kind of quirky (In a good way).
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#18
Quote by Dio10101
Nothing. Unless the tuning is abused. It can lead to dependency, which takes away from musicianship, and people won't really know how to play without it(not always but occasionally) and they won't be able to write heavy riffs without it. Nothin is wrong with it, as long as it isn't abused and overused.


Yeah, I see some bands that tend to use drop D and play piss easy riffs that someone with 1 finger could play.
❝Don't be afraid of death, but of an inadequate life❞
Bertolt Bretcht


#19
Quote by Phazon
Yeah don't worry I refuse to play in drop D no matter how awesome the riffs are.
I mostly play real heavy metal so i find it strange that everything I come up with sounds kind of quirky (In a good way).

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#20
Quote by Dio10101
Nothing. Unless the tuning is abused. It can lead to dependency, which takes away from musicianship, and people won't really know how to play without it(not always but occasionally) and they won't be able to write heavy riffs without it. Nothin is wrong with it, as long as it isn't abused and overused.
That's ridiculous man, what be wrong with playing in drop tunings 100% of the time? How can you abuse a tuning, that's a silly idea. There is no one reason to stay in standard tuning if you want to be able to play riffs that need to be drop tuned. There is too much standard tuning chauvinism.
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#21
Quote by KirkMetallica
Yeah, I see some bands that tend to use drop D and play piss easy riffs that someone with 1 finger could play.

Exactly. Then there's other bands like Lamb Of God who use the tuning well.
#22
Drop D is nice because it allows you to play nice big chuggy open notes in the middle of a riff that otherwise takes place higher up the neck.

Although if you're using it to help you write heavier riffs, you're probably doing it wrong. Try imagining riffs and then working out how to play them. Don't pick up your guitar, play anything and hope it's good.
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Last edited by whalepudding at Jun 6, 2010,
#23
Stop Fighting yourself, If you naturally write in one style, then maybe you should look into it instead of fighting it.

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#24
Quote by 18th_Angel
That's ridiculous man, what be wrong with playing in drop tunings 100% of the time? How can you abuse a tuning, that's a silly idea. There is no one reason to stay in standard tuning if you want to be able to play riffs that need to be drop tuned. There is too much standard tuning chauvinism.


I actually have to agree on this one. Anyone could easily say that they're
abusing the E standard. I never chose to play Drop D when I was first learning because I wanted to learn the chords properly. Now I never play Drop D because I think its a cheap way to sound heavy <_<

Even though I really like the heavy. Drop D is a bit too heavy for the party heavy metal I tend to lean towards (Something you can play at a party).
Ace of spades/kill em all type stuff.
Quote by LivinJoke84
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#25
Quote by 18th_Angel
That's ridiculous man, what be wrong with playing in drop tunings 100% of the time? How can you abuse a tuning, that's a silly idea. There is no one reason to stay in standard tuning if you want to be able to play riffs that need to be drop tuned. There is too much standard tuning chauvinism.

It's just really heavily relied on, and it's kind of silly to keep yourself to one tuning(yes, that includes E standard), i like to mix between drop tuning and standard, but people thinking that they need drop tunings to be heavy or play well is just saddening to me. As a beginner(which i'm assuming this person is) learning only how to write and play in drop d is such a bad idea, since this make standard seem a lot harder(i know, I've been in this situation). It's not wrong by any means to use it. Just laying your fingers across the strings and just using that to sustain chords(like Avenged Sevenfold, whom i do not enjoy, however do use the tuning well in some instances) is just a ridiculous concept to me. It just seems like its taking musicianship from metal to me. I recognize that a lot of bands use the tuning, but it just doesn't seem right to me to use it that much. The same way it seems right for you to use it(i assume you do)
#26
Refusuing to play in a certain tuning because you consider it lazy or too easy is pretty ridiculous.
#27
Quote by osXtiger
Stop Fighting yourself, If you naturally write in one style, then maybe you should look into it instead of fighting it.


Well I used to only be able to write Pop punk / blues / light rock riffs for ages, but I learned a bit of music theory and I'm starting to write very heavy riffs.
❝Don't be afraid of death, but of an inadequate life❞
Bertolt Bretcht


#28
For the record >_>

I'm not a beginner.
I've written a bunch of cool stuff..just not in my favorite style..which is what I'm trying to do.
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#29
Quote by Dio10101
It's just really heavily relied on, and it's kind of silly to keep yourself to one tuning(yes, that includes E standard), i like to mix between drop tuning and standard, but people thinking that they need drop tunings to be heavy or play well is just saddening to me. As a beginner(which i'm assuming this person is) learning only how to write and play in drop d is such a bad idea, since this make standard seem a lot harder(i know, I've been in this situation). It's not wrong by any means to use it. Just laying your fingers across the strings and just using that to sustain chords(like Avenged Sevenfold, whom i do not enjoy, however do use the tuning well in some instances) is just a ridiculous concept to me. It just seems like its taking musicianship from metal to me. I recognize that a lot of bands use the tuning, but it just doesn't seem right to me to use it that much. The same way it seems right for you to use it(i assume you do)
Nah I don't use it, I have a floating trem on my guitar and never go out of standard cos I can't be bothered readjusting it. I used to use it relatively often on my previous guitar from December 07 back to when I started because I used to play a lot of tool back then.
The only thing that's changed is the bottom string, so you still have to play any chord or scale that starts on the A string or higher as you would with E standard, so as long as you are doing something other than bottom string power chords all the time then you'll be getting plenty of practice at playing things as you would in E anyway. It really doesn't change that much.
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#30
Quote by Jiggzy.UK
Learn some theory. I'm not trying to be a smart arse btw.


This. I'm a lazy bastard when it comes to theory which is the reason most of what I write sucks.

Also agree with the guy who said come up with something in your head and then figure it out instead of trying to compose on the fly. Once you've got the bare bones laid out in front of you then you can worry about tweaking it and jazzing it up.
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#31
Quote by boycew02
This. I'm a lazy bastard when it comes to theory which is the reason most of what I write sucks.

Also agree with the guy who said come up with something in your head and then figure it out instead of trying to compose on the fly. Once you've got the bare bones laid out in front of you then you can worry about tweaking it and jazzing it up.

I only have a basic amount of theory, and i write pretty good stuff. Basically the only thing you need to know is scales around the fretboard, and how to mix them with other scales and techniques you've gathered through your playing days.
#32
Quote by 18th_Angel
Nah I don't use it, I have a floating trem on my guitar and never go out of standard cos I can't be bothered readjusting it. I used to use it relatively often on my previous guitar from December 07 back to when I started because I used to play a lot of tool back then.
The only thing that's changed is the bottom string, so you still have to play any chord or scale that starts on the A string or higher as you would with E standard, so as long as you are doing something other than bottom string power chords all the time then you'll be getting plenty of practice at playing things as you would in E anyway. It really doesn't change that much.

That difference seems to be pretty pivotal in a lot of bands use of the tuning. I use a tuning thats called D6(I think, DGDGBE), which makes the power chord First G and the second D, and people(if they get past the idea of that tuning) think its strange i don't put so much emphasis on the easy G(as i call it) power chord. It just seems like it CAN(not always) take away from the musicianship metal usually has.
#33
Tune to Drop G, and chug a dissonant chord at a really slow tempo. ITZ SOOO BRUTLZ LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
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#34
The real answer is to just practice writing heavy metal riffs. They'll probably start off sucking, but you'll eventually get better at it. Theory won't help you come up with riffs, nor will different tunings.

EDIT: BTW "Devil's Tritone"? There's only one tritone, so the "Devil's" is unnecessary, and a bit misleading as well, as it implies that the interval itself is heavy or something.
Last edited by Declan87 at Jun 6, 2010,