#1
hey guys, i record thru a headset mic, and a jcm900 with a mxr 10 band eq,
heres a small tip,
place your mic, behind the cab, with an offset to the side .
here is an example, of mic dead infront of the speaker,
and mic behind and above the speaker.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Lespauljames/music/play847270
obvioulsy with a bit of time spent EQ ing you could get a much better sound than that.
but there we go just a short, look at this kind of thing!
haha
#2
You can get the 2nd sound with the 1st mic placement and adding some room reverb in the mix. Only not as muddy.
#3
i found whenever recording at louder volumes to give the sound more oomph, micing the front would expose the mic to louder frequencies clipping the input, i found placing it rearward kept the signal basically detirioration free while using the headset still as opposed to a real mic
#4
Hmm im gunna have to try this out
Thanks man
Guitars :
Washburn Stealth Pro TransBlack
Ibanez Prestige RG1570
Fender GDO 300 Acoustic

Pedals :
Digi tech RP100
Boss Metal Core
Boss Mega Dist
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss SD-1
MXR 10 band EQ

Amp : Blackstar HT5
#5
Quote by Lespauljames
i found whenever recording at louder volumes to give the sound more oomph, micing the front would expose the mic to louder frequencies clipping the input, i found placing it rearward kept the signal basically detirioration free while using the headset still as opposed to a real mic


You're right about the clipping part. Sometimes you need to move the front mic away from the speaker some 5 inches or more to be able to withstand the sound pressure. Pointing the mic near the edge of the speaker will also give you more bass, but you probably knew that already.
Miking the back and mixing it in with the front mic can also do wonders, one just have to watch out for having both of them signals in phase. Some people also use a room mic.