#1
yeah so i plan on putting the Gibson humbucker sized p-90 (p94) pickup into my lp studio.
My only question is they make one for the neck position and one for the bridge, does the position effect the tone or anything?
#2
The pickup itself is very much the same but the wiring that comes out of it is routed differently for convenience when you're actually wiring the instrument. I suggest getting the one for the position you wish to install it in, obviously.
#3
I know i should get the position i install it in. lol
i just wasnt sure if the positions themselves would have any effect on tone
#4
There are individual ones for the neck and bridge. But it won't give you a traditional P-90 sound due to the size. You might be better off looking into the P-Rails from Seymour Duncan which would probably give you a more authentic P-90 tone.

edit:
Quote by RadioMuse
The pickup itself is very much the same but the wiring that comes out of it is routed differently for convenience when you're actually wiring the instrument. I suggest getting the one for the position you wish to install it in, obviously.

Wouldn't the wiring be the same since it's a single-coil? It's two-conductor wiring. One his hot and the other goes to the ground. Isn't that how it works? I think neck one would sound different from the bridge. The bridge might be hotter. There's no other reason to differentiate between the two of them unless one is reverse-wound to cancel out hum.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Jun 6, 2010,
#5
No, the P-Rails is even less of an original P-90 tone. That said, the SD Phat Cat is closer to original P-90 tones than the P-94 is, and it's a bit cheaper too. But yeah, just because of the sheer size difference, no humbucker-sized P-90 is going to sound exactly like an original P-90. Also original P-90s used Alnico III magnets while the Phat Cat uses Alnico II and the P-94 uses Alnico V (of the two, the Alnico II is closer in tone, hence the Phat Cat being the btter choice).

As far as neck vs bridge go, yes, there is a difference in tone. A bridge pickup is wound to handle the smaller vibrations and naturally brighter tone of the strings near the bridge (this usually means being over-wound with more output to make up for the smaller vibrations and more windings rolls out more treble, helping neutralise the bright bridge tone) while a neck pickup is wound to handle the natural tone of the strings at the neck position better (this normally means being under-wound so the pickup isn't overpowered by the much larger vibrations at this position). It is important to get the right pickup in the right position. A bridge pickup put in the neck position will create a horrific muddy mess while a neck pickup in the bridge position will be too weak and won't react properly.
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#6
I just looked at the SD Phat cat with that pick up does it matter which position i install it in?
#7
Yes. Same as I just explained.
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