#1
Hello friends just a quick question about metalcore guitar recordings...

How are the volume levels of both the guitars set up?
If both guitars do leads and rhytm, does the volume of one have to be higher than the other?
Because I thought that if you were guitar recording, one guitar would play in the left ear and the other in the right ear, and both of them would have more or less the same volume level, but I've heard that if you do this the sound will be distorted, how accurate is this?
So taking all this into account the question is: if both guitars are playing the same riff, does the volume level of one have to be higher than the other?
#2
Record leads and Rhythm parts separately. even if its the same guitarist doing them. Leaves more to mix with. Also Automation means the levels don't need to be constant throughout the song and you can increase one track as it becomes more important.
#3
Well. I usually quad track the rhythm section, 2 on the left and 2 on the right, then center pan the solo. Keep in mind though to use less gain as it adds up.
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#4
Quote by JoePerry4life
Well. I usually quad track the rhythm section, 2 on the left and 2 on the right, then center pan the solo. Keep in mind though to use less gain as it adds up.

Thanks for your answers, however I'm still a bit doubtful about the volume levels,
The thing is one person said one guitar has to have a higher volume than the other guitar when doing rhytm, i.e. when both guitars are playing the same riff, so the sound doesnt get distorted...however i thought both guitars could have the same volume level, but one would go in the left ear and the other in the right ear, so which assumption is the correct one??
#5
Quote by celitus
Record leads and Rhythm parts separately. even if its the same guitarist doing them. Leaves more to mix with. Also Automation means the levels don't need to be constant throughout the song and you can increase one track as it becomes more important.

Thanks for your answers, however I'm still a bit doubtful about the volume levels,
The thing is one person said one guitar has to have a higher volume than the other guitar when doing rhytm, i.e. when both guitars are playing the same riff, so the sound doesnt get distorted...however i thought both guitars could have the same volume level, but one would go in the left ear and the other in the right ear, so which assumption is the correct one??
#6
Quote by damienro0
Thanks for your answers, however I'm still a bit doubtful about the volume levels,
The thing is one person said one guitar has to have a higher volume than the other guitar when doing rhytm, i.e. when both guitars are playing the same riff, so the sound doesnt get distorted...however i thought both guitars could have the same volume level, but one would go in the left ear and the other in the right ear, so which assumption is the correct one??

that person is wrong

you want all your instrument to come to in at about the same input level (which is approaching 0 db) you can mix them lower later if you need to.
#7
I've never heard that before, but why don't you record a riff and mess around with the volume and panning and see what sounds best to you? I mean, none of us can really tell you if you like what you're mixing. Experiment! mess around a little! that's half the fun anyways.

also are you talking about dual tracking or two different guitar parts? if its dual tracking, they should definitely be the same volume, one panned 80-100 right and the other panned equally left. if you mean two guitar parts that are playing the same riff, then mess around a little. personally if i have two guitar rhythm parts, i don't pan them hard left and hard right. i usually dual track each then send both of each guitars tracks to a different channel and pan one guitar slightly left and the other slightly right. lead type things i usually put right down the middle.

Good luck.