#1
Ok so after almost 3 years in I'm finally starting to get this blues stuff. My latest epiphany came from the latest song I've been studying Johnny be goode. Before this song I thought that most blues HAD to stay in the minor pentatonic scale with an added blue note ie the flat fifth. But this song surprised me with adding other notes such as the major 2nd and the major 6th. It also alternates major and minor thirds which I suppose didn't surprise me much but I haven't been practicing that way. Bottom line is this song sounds much more blues to me than the other solos I've learned that stick to just the pent blues scale like comfortably numb. So why is that?
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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#3
It's like a mix of the major and minor pentatonic. That's what makes it so strange. Cause it still uses the minor 3rd.
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#5
There is a method that bb king uses. Lets assume we are in A. Play a major pent over the a chord, when you switch to the d, start playing minor. There is actually a video on that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kgu0w0KSgQU&feature=fvsr
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#6
You're likely aware that most of the old blues artists knew little or nothing of theory and wouldn't have been able to tell a flatted fifth from a horse's patootie...

They were just talented guys who fooled around till they found something that sounds good.
There's nothing wrong with analyzing "roots" music; but I think it can be overdone.