#1
hey guys ive just started to foray into writing my own music but im getting quite confused with the theory side of things.

i was wondering if im writing a song in the key of D major for example do i have to start my into riff/progression with the D?
#4
no as long as it resolves to d it will still be in d
the easiest way to resolve to it would be to start or stop in it but it can be done without
#5
Quote by supersac
no as long as it resolves to d it will still be in d
the easiest way to resolve to it would be to start or stop in it but it can be done without

Just like with the starting note...

it can end on any note and still be in D.
#6
No. Look at the notes of a D major. D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D. You can start or stop on any note in that scale. Technically I don't think you even have to play a D for it to be in the key of D major as long as you use the notes in the D major scale.
"Men profess to be lovers of music, but for the most part they give no evidence in their opinions and lives that they have heard it." ~Henry David Thoreau
#7
For the key to be in D or any other key, it has to CENTER around D, not necessarily start or end on D.
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#8
Quote by pearlJam_31490
No. Look at the notes of a D major. D-E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D. You can start or stop on any note in that scale. Technically I don't think you even have to play a D for it to be in the key of D major as long as you use the notes in the D major scale.


You can start and end on a D# and it can still be in D. The key is determined by the harmony.
#9
Hell it doenst even have to center on D to be "in D." Key signatures are kind of obsolete in music like 20th C. jazz. Seriously. The key sig may say D but it'll go all over the place.
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#10
thanks alot for the help bit of a silly question but yeah

i have another question is it alright to have notes out of the scale in a riff?
#12
Of course. It's more interesting that way too. As long as it's done tastfully, non chord tones are GREAT. An A and a D#? Not so much but it could still work.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
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American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#13
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Of course. It's more interesting that way too. As long as it's done tastfully, non chord tones are GREAT. An A and a D#? Not so much but it could still work.


You see that all the time when songs use the #i diminished chord as passing. A la: D - D#o - Em - A7 - D. Or something along those lines. The raised first scale degree creates a diminished chord and acts as a passing tone between the D and the E (the I and the ii, leading into the ii V I).
#14
As long as it is your music, it follow your rules. Simple as pie.

When writing, only one rule counts: If it sounds awesome, it is.

Though keeping to the key might help.
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#15
I had a freind that wrote a song that didin't have a single Bb in it and was written in Bb. It actually resolved to it to, I was dumbfounded.