#1
i go by the whole 5 positions thing oppossed to the 7 positions i heard some people use. anyways, i noticed a few of the minor positions are the same as the major positions, is this correct? i did this on my own and found out the positions and looked online and they say the same thing. it just seems weird, do any of you guys do this? like use the same position for both minor and major?
#2
because the major scales have a harmonic minor
a to c for example
a is the harmonic minor of c
they have the same notes but have a different root note as to sound minor
#3
Quote by supersac
because the major scales have a harmonic minor
a to c for example
a is the harmonic minor of c
they have the same notes but have a different root note as to sound minor


but it's completely normal right?
i usually use this site: http://gosk.com/scales/major-scale-for-guitar.php
and just wanted to know if i did it right. so are those steps correct?

also, i this isn't exactly related to the first questions, but what is the correct term for just a basic minor scale?
i noticed there's several names it seems for it.
#4
Quote by schism8
but it's completely normal right?
i usually use this site: http://gosk.com/scales/major-scale-for-guitar.php
and just wanted to know if i did it right. so are those steps correct?

also, i this isn't exactly related to the first questions, but what is the correct term for just a basic minor scale?
i noticed there's several names it seems for it.


yeah its normal every major scale has a minor
and there a a few different minors harmonic,and melodic are two i remember right now
and i use this site for my needs
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chords-to-scale.php
look at the circle of fifths and it shows you which majors go with each minor
#5
Quote by schism8
but it's completely normal right?
i usually use this site: http://gosk.com/scales/major-scale-for-guitar.php
and just wanted to know if i did it right. so are those steps correct?

also, i this isn't exactly related to the first questions, but what is the correct term for just a basic minor scale?
i noticed there's several names it seems for it.


The relevant minor of a Major scale is basically the same notes, as with anything in the diatonic. You can play a minor on any modal positions. And the regular minor is called an Aeolian scale.
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#6
Quote by supersac
yeah its normal every major scale has a minor
and there a a few different minors harmonic,and melodic are two i remember right now
and i use this site for my needs
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chords-to-scale.php
look at the circle of fifths and it shows you which majors go with each minor

just one? cause i noticed a few.
actually, i asked because of that site. i can't seem to find the minor scale i know.. i can't find it.
i'll take a look
#8
Quote by MonsterOfRock
The relevant minor of a Major scale is basically the same notes, as with anything in the diatonic. You can play a minor on any modal positions. And the regular minor is called an Aeolian scale.


ah, alright, i found it on the site. why don't they just call it minor scale?
#9
Quote by schism8
ah, alright, i found it on the site. why don't they just call it minor scale?


because that might confuse it with other minor scales
#10
Quote by supersac
because that might confuse it with other minor scales


oh. just to make sure i'm trying to get the basic scales down. and those four being major, maj pent, min, min pent... so i chose the right minor scale, right?
#12
Quote by supersac
because the major scales have a relative minor
a to c for example
a is the relative minor of c
they have the same notes but have a different root note as to sound minor

fixed.

But yes, the patterns for the natural minor scale are exactly the same as the patterns for the major scale - they'll just be in different places.
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#13
its just the third note flat by one half step or if its melodic then the 7th is also one half step lower doesent really requier changing your whole hand position for such a minor change like that.
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#14
Quote by schism8
i go by the whole 5 positions thing oppossed to the 7 positions i heard some people use. anyways, i noticed a few of the minor positions are the same as the major positions, is this correct? i did this on my own and found out the positions and looked online and they say the same thing. it just seems weird, do any of you guys do this? like use the same position for both minor and major?


Yes, but you're talking about "shapes", not "positions".

Every major key has a relative minor key (where the major scale of that key and the natural minor of the relative minor have the same notes). So- as has been said- the C major scale has the same notes as the A natural minor scale (and so you could use the same shapes on the guitar neck for both).

"Positions" are something different. If you were playing from the third fret (i.e. first finger on the third fret), you would say you're in "third position"- regardless of what shape you're using. So it's a position (on the neck) rather than a shape (of notes).
#15
Quote by chainsawguitar
Yes, but you're talking about "shapes", not "positions".

Every major key has a relative minor key (where the major scale of that key and the natural minor of the relative minor have the same notes). So- as has been said- the C major scale has the same notes as the A natural minor scale (and so you could use the same shapes on the guitar neck for both).

"Positions" are something different. If you were playing from the third fret (i.e. first finger on the third fret), you would say you're in "third position"- regardless of what shape you're using. So it's a position (on the neck) rather than a shape (of notes).


i think i understand. so those shapes are for both major and minor scales, right?
so lets say i play the C major scale, and then i played the A minor since both scales have no accidentals it's technically the same thing, right? it's the same notes but just in a different order?
#16
It's the same notes yes, ultimately how those notes are being used and the context they're in will determine which scale they are.
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#17
Quote by schism8
i think i understand. so those shapes are for both major and minor scales, right?
so lets say i play the C major scale, and then i played the A minor since both scales have no accidentals it's technically the same thing, right? it's the same notes but just in a different order?

Yeah it's the same notes, so you wouldn't really be playing A minor at all, that's just in your head. If your progression is C Major and you play the notes of C Major (even if you refer to it as A minor) it's still C Major.
#18
Quote by steven seagull
It's the same notes yes, ultimately how those notes are being used and the context they're in will determine which scale they are.


so i was right?

also, i was wondering why every major scale has a minor with the same notes just in a different order?
#19
Quote by tenfold
Yeah it's the same notes, so you wouldn't really be playing A minor at all, that's just in your head. If your progression is C Major and you play the notes of C Major (even if you refer to it as A minor) it's still C Major.


but what makes it different? the only thing i can think of if you're stacking notes for chords in say threes you come up with different chords, is that it?
#20
Quote by schism8
but what makes it different? the only thing i can think of if you're stacking notes for chords in say threes you come up with different chords, is that it?

The resolution & tonic. If you're in C Major, all the notes in C Major and A minor will be heard in relation to C Major. So if you play an E, it will be heard as a major third in relation to C Major instead of a perfect fifth.
#21
Quote by supersac
and there a a few different minors harmonic,and melodic are two i remember right now


uhh.... natural? XD


Quote by schism8
i go by the whole 5 positions thing oppossed to the 7 positions i heard some people use. anyways, i noticed a few of the minor positions are the same as the major positions, is this correct? i did this on my own and found out the positions and looked online and they say the same thing. it just seems weird, do any of you guys do this? like use the same position for both minor and major?


You should think in terms of notes.

The major scale and the NATURAL minor scale have the exact same notes, the difference between one and other is the tonic. For example the C major scale goes around the C note while the A minor scale goes around the A, they have the same notes but on different "order".

Since they have the same notes the positions are the same.
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