#1
I am wanting to know. If you have say a Amaj9 (A,C#,E,G#,B).. can you put B as the bass note with it being Amaj9/B or does it turn into some sort of B chord...

I just need to clarify this.. thanks.
#2
Quote by akaPeach
I am wanting to know. If you have say a Amaj9 (A,C#,E,G#,B).. can you put B as the bass note with it being Amaj9/B or does it turn into some sort of B chord...


it'd just be Amaj9/B, unless context dictated otherwise.
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#3
Quote by AeolianWolf
it'd just be Amaj9/B, unless context dictated otherwise.



+1

It's all about context.
#4
im sorry but there is not point in naming it becasue it could be so many different things..

with inversions a person could hear the whole chord or A maj7 chord with 9. A A maj and E maj chord together and a C min 7 with a 6

But i dont think it would turn into a B chord if the B is in the bass.. to 'name' it a B chord a D or D# would have to be present.. and D# is tritone of A and leading tone of E so...
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Last edited by seymour_jackson at Jun 7, 2010,
#5
Quote by seymour_jackson
im sorry but there is not point in naming it becasue it could be so many different things..

with inversions a person could hear the whole chord or A dom7 chord with 9. A A maj and E maj chord together and a C min 7

But i dont think it would turn into a B chord if the B is in the bass.. to 'name' it a B chord a D or D# would have to be present.. and D# is tritone of A and leading tone of E so...

Bm9sus4add6(no5)

There are "suspended" chords that don't have the 3rd of a chord in it. They're VERY common.
#6
just played it on piano.. sounds like A Maj7th with a B wanting to resolve down to A.. Bass line goes 2 - 1

naming this seems pointless
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#7
Quote by seymour_jackson
just played it on piano.. sounds like A Maj7th with a B wanting to resolve down to A.. Bass line goes 2 - 1

naming this seems pointless

Of course it does. There's no context to dictate otherwise.

Were you really thinking that, by itself, the B would sound like it's the root?
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Bm9sus4add6(no5)

There are "suspended" chords that don't have the 3rd of a chord in it. They're VERY common.


there is no reason why I would ever call it that

and to boot, since your B is the bass all of your notes are an octave higher

seems super complex to call it your name.. but i think whats more important is what you hear....
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#9
Quote by akaPeach
I am wanting to know. If you have say a Amaj9 (A,C#,E,G#,B).. can you put B as the bass note with it being Amaj9/B or does it turn into some sort of B chord...

I just need to clarify this.. thanks.


As has been said, it depends entirely on context. As long as the name you call it describes what notes are meant to be played, the rest is interpretation.

When I saw the title of this thread, I thought you were going to use a 13th chord as an example (which is much less obvious if you think about it).

Say you had an A13:

A C# E G B D F#

...and you (for some reason) played it with a G in the bass, you would have:

G B D F# A C# E

...which is actually a Gmaj13#11...

...so which name would you use?

The answer is, again, to do with context. If the chord resolved to some kind of D major, then you would definitely call it an A13 (because thats pretty much a V7 - I progression). In other positions you might consider other names (e.g. if it was a G lydian vamp, or in a song thats mostly in G major where G is the key centre, you might want to call it Gmaj13#11).

So yeh, context is a huge factor here.

If your Amaj9 is in an A major progression, and functioning the same way as an A major chord would, then it should be called Amaj/B...but- say- if it resolves to a B7 chord, then you could maybe call it Bm13(no third) or something (or any variation on that) because of the way it resolves...
#10
cool thanks for the help guys, and no need to get all huffy about it. Im pretty new to chord spelling. but still, thanks. btw, the progression it was in was Amaj7, Amaj7/B, C#min7
#11
Quote by akaPeach
cool thanks for the help guys, and no need to get all huffy about it. Im pretty new to chord spelling. but still, thanks. btw, the progression it was in was Amaj7, Amaj7/B, C#min7


see, in this case, i wouldn't call it Amaj7/B (or Amaj9/B), because the context is giving you ascending movement. i'd want to call it some kind of B. which looks better: A, A, C# or A, B, C#? it's easier to see the movement this way.

Quote by DiminishedFifth
Bm9sus4add6(no5)


this certainly contains the right notes, but it seems it's an over-complication. i'd just call it Bm13sus4. the 11 (if present in the chord) is the same as the 4, so you're alright. i could put (no5), but the fifth is often the first tone to be omitted in extended chords, so it's not necessary (but not wrong, either).

Quote by DiminishedFifth
There are "suspended" chords that don't have the 3rd of a chord in it. They're VERY common.


of course they're common. that's basically what defines a sus2 or sus4 chord - that there's no third.
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#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
of course they're common. that's basically what defines a sus2 or sus4 chord - that there's no third.


He was saying that suspensions were common in response to seymour_jackson saying that in order for it to a be a B chord a D or D# would need to be present.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#13
In the progression he gave it's simply an Amaj7 chord, the B being a passing note in the bass.

No need for silly chord names
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jun 8, 2010,