#1
Hey guys, I've discovered somthing that works wonders for your playing, and it is probably one of the easiest strategies to implement if you are looking improve hand strength and speed.

Try conducting your practice sessions on an acoustic guitar. Just make sure you put some heavier strings on there. Since acoustics are generally more difficult to play you will need to play slower and exert more effort to play well.

However, once you return to the electric guitar, you should find that your hands cut through the strings effortly.

Anyone ever try this out? I think it's awesome.
#3
+1 on that.
I started on classical, so I learned a lot of metallica riffs on nylon strings lol.
and all the basic chords/barres etc.
When I went onto my strat, it was so much smaller and less stretching involved.
then when I went down to my Dean and BC it was even smaller and slimmer.

You really gotta work an acoustic, that's the great thing.
There's so much more manipulation to get the sound you like.
I still use the acoustic I purchased.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#4
meh

attention-seeking, sensationalist thread title coupled with a post that contains nothing remotely useful screams "I need an excuse to post so people will click on the links in my sig".

*reported*
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Quote by steven seagull
meh

attention-seeking, sensationalist thread title coupled with a post that contains nothing remotely useful screams "I need an excuse to post so people will click on the links in my sig".

*reported*


I'm sorry you couldn't appreciate the suggestions. Just trying to share with others what worked for me.

Excuse me for trying to create a title that would actually make people want to click on the post I took the time to write. If you didn't like the post then you could always just click the "back" button.

You should probably be reported for making such a frivolous accusation.
#6
I appreciate the idea (I've done it before), but it doesn't work all that well.

Guitar playing (and in turn, shredding) is ALL about muscle memory.

Unless your acoustic has the same scale and neck shape, you are going to screw with that muscle memory to an extent.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG7421 (MIJ) Dimarzio SD-7/AN-7
ESP LTD EC407 (stock)
Ibanez S320 (Tone Zone/PAF Pro)
ESP LTD EC1000 (stock)
Seagull C-6 Concert Acoustic
Godin MultiAc Nylon Encore

Amps:
Peavey 6505
Peavey 6505+
Marshall DSL100
Mesa Boogie Tremoverb
Mesa Boogie 412 Rectifier Standard Cab
Randall Iso112

Pedals:
Horizon Devices Precision Overdrive
ISP Decimator
Maxon OD808
MXR Carbon Copy
Shure GLX wireless system
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus
#7
Quote by rlheart
I appreciate the idea (I've done it before), but it doesn't work all that well.

Guitar playing (and in turn, shredding) is ALL about muscle memory.

Unless your acoustic has the same scale and neck shape, you are going to screw with that muscle memory to an extent.


I dunno, I see your point. However, I find that it's not hard to re-adapt to the size of the electric neck after playing acoustic. All in all it takes about 1-5 minutes.

In similar vein, the whole situation is analogous to weight lifting. After doing the same exercize for a while, the body begins to adapt to the motions required to do that particular exercise. Thus, in order to avoid "plateau" effects where the same exercise ceases to lead to gains in strength, it is necessary to add variation to form and routine. This leads to additional muscles being worked that aren't otherwise.

Remember Rocky 3 (i think) when Apollo Creed makes rocky swim, justifying this on grounds that he will "work muscles he never knew he had."

The same applies here. Even just playing a different electric guitar would have the same payoff only to a lesser degree. That is because different guitars will work different muscles in the hand, and thus make your hands stronger all round. This strength increase is transferrable to other instruments and other playing contexts.

Btw, most people who have replied seem to have made this observation before (that acoustic playing boosts hand strength); I figured this would be the case. As I have done this many times in the past. However, just recently I rediscovered how effective it can be. Sometimes we forget to practice the tried and true methods for improvement on grounds that we think we are above such things, forgot, or are just too lazy. Just thought it I'd pitch the idea, for anyone that's in a slump.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Jun 7, 2010,
#8
Quote by Riffman15
I dunno, I see your point. However, I find that it's not hard to re-adapt to the size of the electric neck after playing acoustic. All in all it takes about 1-5 minutes.

In similar vein, the whole situation is analogous to weight lifting. After doing the same exercize for a while, the body begins to adapt to the motions required to do that particular exercise. Thus, in order to avoid "plateau" effects where the same exercise ceases to lead to gains in strength, it is necessary to add variation to form and routine. This leads to additional muscles being worked that aren't otherwise.

Remember Rocky 3 (i think) when Apollo Creed makes rocky swim, justifying this on grounds that he will "work muscles he never knew he had."

The same applies here. Even just playing a different electric guitar would have the same payoff only to a lesser degree. That is because different guitars will work different muscles in the hand, and thus make your hands stronger all round. This strength increase is transferrable to other instruments and other playing contexts.

Btw, most people who have replied seem to have made this observation before (that acoustic playing boosts hand strength); I figured this would be the case. As I have done this many times in the past. However, just recently I rediscovered how effective it can be. Sometimes we forget to practice the tried and true methods for improvement on grounds that we think we are above such things, forgot, or are just too lazy. Just thought it I'd pitch the idea, for anyone that's in a slump.


It's great for warming up for sure, and the skills DO translate over from one guitar to another, BUT it does screw with you a bit.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG7421 (MIJ) Dimarzio SD-7/AN-7
ESP LTD EC407 (stock)
Ibanez S320 (Tone Zone/PAF Pro)
ESP LTD EC1000 (stock)
Seagull C-6 Concert Acoustic
Godin MultiAc Nylon Encore

Amps:
Peavey 6505
Peavey 6505+
Marshall DSL100
Mesa Boogie Tremoverb
Mesa Boogie 412 Rectifier Standard Cab
Randall Iso112

Pedals:
Horizon Devices Precision Overdrive
ISP Decimator
Maxon OD808
MXR Carbon Copy
Shure GLX wireless system
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus
#11
Quote by Riffman15
another embarrassing situation: being at a party then having some chick ask you to play the house acoustic. . . looks at ground, "I can only play electric guitar. . .

someone's not getting laid that night, lol.

My response to that would be: *in a heavy Scandinavian accent* "I don'ts plays the grampas guitars, they's for grampas and pussies."
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.