#1
Hi eveyone, I have a stupid question- What frequencies are control by the Bass, Mid, and Treble knobs on an amp? I was wondering about this because i am looking to buy a new amp, and some of them have a graphic EQ(which i'm not very familiar with), and I want to Know how it relates to the 3 tone control knobs. Thanx so much in advance.
#2
Depends on the amp. I think it goes a bit like this on average.

Bass: Below 300 Hz
Mids: Around 600 Hz.
Treble: Above 2 KHz. edit: that's probably a bit lower, maybe 1KHz, or 1.5 KHz.
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Last edited by Kanthras at Jun 7, 2010,
#4
Quote by mr_hankey
There are no rules about it, so it will differ between amps.

+1

With all controls on amps there is no 'rule' as to what they do, or how they work. Over the years lots of ideas have been tossed around and some have stuck, some haven't. The result is that the label of what a company calls a knob on an amp means just about nothing... You have to look at a schematic to really tell what controls do what.
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#5
Thanx so much, i guess ill try to find the induvidual frequencies for each of the amps im looking at.
#6
They're different for every amp, but if you just want a rough idea, the typical Marshall EQ is something like this:

Treble: 2.5kHz
Mid: 700Hz
Bass: 100Hz

Presence is around 5-6kHz, if you want to include that. These are all approximations, since not every Marshall uses those, and Fender uses completely different ones I'm sure, but I don't remember the fender ones off the top of my head so this is what you get
#7
What are the highest and lowest frequencies acheivable on a guitar anyway?
#8
Basically anything in your hearing range. But most speakers don't react to anything under 75Hz and above 7kHz they react poorly. So yeah... you CAN make a guitar speaker work with a 16kHz signal, but it'll be very quiet compared to lower frequencies.
#9
Quote by Roc8995
They're different for every amp, but if you just want a rough idea, the typical Marshall EQ is something like this:

Treble: 2.5kHz
Mid: 700Hz
Bass: 100Hz

Presence is around 5-6kHz, if you want to include that. These are all approximations, since not every Marshall uses those, and Fender uses completely different ones I'm sure, but I don't remember the fender ones off the top of my head so this is what you get


Doesn't the presence knob control high mids?
#10
knowing the numbers won't do diddly squat. Most tone stacks are interactive so there's stuff happening to other frequencies when you turn one knob. It's not that complicated just listen to a bunch of amps and buy the one that you like. All the numbers in the world won't tell you which amp would sound the best to you.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#11
Quote by stykerwolf
Doesn't the presence knob control high mids?

Yes, they do. One of my numbers is wrong. Treble is probably around 10KHz, but I can't ever remember. It's not usually something I bother calculating on an amp.
#12
The presence controls how much of the top end of the negative feedback is sent to ground. Think of it as a treble control on the negative feedback circuit.
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#15
Quote by AcousticMirror
All the numbers in the world won't tell you which amp would sound the best to you.


You hypocrite.
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#16
Quote by no.mop
You hypocrite.


well i mean eq numbers.
treble 11
mids 0
bass 600000
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#17
An EQ will usually be pretty clearly marked as to what freq they affect. Plus they will have a narrow band of what they do affect. Much more precise plus an EQ will boost as well as cut. Tone controls on an amp unless active will only cut.

Go download duncans amp tools: tone stack calculator it will give you a graph showing the freqs of many tone control set ups.
#18
Ok I downloaded the tone stack calculater, it is really helpful thanx guys.