#1
Hi guys, well basically I'm going to try out for a band pretty soon and they straight away want me to jump into writing songs with them. The thing is i never wrote my own bass line before and i don't want to feel like i'm holding them up when we meet for the band practice/session. I know the whole root note process but do you know how i could practice writing my own basslines or any source or website that could help me with it?

Thanks in advance, Pat.
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#3
Have them get a recording of the songs they already got and then take the recordings home and try writing a bassline to it.
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#4
The way I write bass lines is just by doing the root note thing, then throwing in some octave jumps, then doing some pentatonic stuff. Never fails to make a kickass line.
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#5
Quote by lkngro
The way I write bass lines is just by doing the root note thing, then throwing in some octave jumps, then doing some pentatonic stuff. Never fails to make a kickass line.


^Do this. It works. You can also try notes from something other than the pentatonic scales, but the old 5-note pentatonic is a great fall-back if you aren't sure.
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#6
Quote by lkngro
The way I write bass lines is just by doing the root note thing, then throwing in some octave jumps, then doing some pentatonic stuff. Never fails to make a kickass line.

I'm in my first band and haven't been playing long, so this is what I do.
It can make for some really cool lines, especially when you are still finding your feet in the band etc
#8
Its more of a matter of comlementing the song then what notes i always feel(of course the notes that fit), no need to show of unless its a show ofy song.
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#9
Go with it...just follow the root the first time you play it, then start playing around with the line and see what sounds good. Don't be afraid of messing up. It's an important part of learning what works and what doesn't. They'd probably rather you went for it and messed up instead of not going for it at all.
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EDIT: Sammcl pretty much got it dead on.
#10
^ what they said is all great places to start.

My advice though is don't be afraid to "hold up" practice, if they want you to write something other than just plain boring crap it will take time for you (especially just starting) to translate your thoughts down to the fret board.

Plus in the writing process imo the bass line is the hardest part of writing the instrumentation. The guitars normally will make their riffs or chord structure and the drums just kind of beat something in time that matches it. The bass has to sit and find a good middle ground and decide when to follow one more than the other. So like I said don't feel as though you're holding up practice but be supportive of their criticism and if they complain ask them their opinions on what they think you should play