#1
I found a really good deal for a lefty LP studio in a pawnshop.

600 bucks (it's 800, but I get a discount) for it, only flaw is that the headstock has snapped before so they repaired it. You can barely tell it was even there or repaired.

I like everything on it, it sounds good, and it's a great deal.

is there some major flaw i'm missing in repaired headstocks?
#2
Quote by Funk Monk
I found a really good deal for a lefty LP studio in a pawnshop.

600 bucks (it's 800, but I get a discount) for it, only flaw is that the headstock has snapped before so they repaired it. You can barely tell it was even there or repaired.

I like everything on it, it sounds good, and it's a great deal.

is there some major flaw i'm missing in repaired headstocks?

Well, probably that you don't have the guarantee that it was fixed properly by a certified, trusted luthier. The thing with headstock repairs, is that when they're done right, the crack is actually stronger than the surrounding wood that is the actual headstock.

The question rises though; If someone had the headstock fixed to the point of it being like new, why would they sell it? Of course, it could always be just because they need money or want to clean up their guitars, but be weary none the less. Play it for a longer length of time than just 10 minutes, to make sure it doesn't shift under heavy use.
#3
Quote by Y00p
Well, probably that you don't have the guarantee that it was fixed properly by a certified, trusted luthier. The thing with headstock repairs, is that when they're done right, the crack is actually stronger than the surrounding wood that is the actual headstock.

The question rises though; If someone had the headstock fixed to the point of it being like new, why would they sell it? Of course, it could always be just because they need money or want to clean up their guitars, but be weary none the less. Play it for a longer length of time than just 10 minutes, to make sure it doesn't shift under heavy use.



I played it extensively (about an hour) until I thought I was satisfied with the sound.

The thing is that I hated the amp I was playing through (marshall mg combo), and it sounded good through it despite me hating the amp to death.

The headstock was very sturdy, and to be able to notice the headstock damage is slim because I believe they did a wonderful job on it. there is but a small tiny scar on the headstock near the serial code, that's it.

It's also from 2001, featuring the old 498t 490r pickups for the studio as opposed to the burstbuckers now.

I believe it could suit me fairly well, especially for such a good price.
#4
I believe you just made your decision then, right?
If it felt and looked sturdy, it probably is. Try knocking off even more of the price!

And if you're still not sure, just yank the headstock quite firmly. You know, LP headstock usually break when you do this with enough force; If it doesn't, this one is repaired properly.

(I kid)