#1
Hi!
I have to write a technical summary about some topics for school... so I need translation help, or right words. ^^
Electric current - what does it do? Does it "flow", like in German?
And Voltage?
I need some verbs please!
Thanks in advance!
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#2
Strom (current) "fließt" (flows)

It flows because of the voltage (Spannung). The voltage is a state of tension, like a ball hanging in mid-air, not a movement, really, so I guess you could say voltage "is"?
#3
Voltage is the number of Coulomb per second. Coulomb is 'charge', so Voltage becomes Charge/Second.
Quote by Snowblind 911





maybe it's because of your description, or the fact that it's 1:30am here, or both, i can't stop giggling.


Sometimes girls say that too...
#4
So current flows?
Thanks for that!

For voltage I was looking for translations of "anliegen" or "abfallen"... Do you know English words for these?
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#5
Quote by Jokaaa
So current flows?
Thanks for that!

For voltage I was looking for translations of "anliegen" or "abfallen"... Do you know English words for these?

"abfallen": to decrease

what exactly do you mean by anliegen? can you use a whole sentance?
#6
A current is a flow of charge, generally carried by electrons. Conventional current is from positve to negative but electron flow is actually from the negative end. Yeah, physics is stupid.
If you're reading this, then chances are you're procrastinating too
#7
Yeah strange. ^^

A sentence with "anliegen"... "An diesem Punkt liegt eine Spannung von 12V an."
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#8
Quote by tomrgane
A current is a flow of charge, generally carried by electrons. Conventional current is from positve to negative but electron flow is actually from the negative end. Yeah, physics is stupid.


No, it was thought that the current went from positive to negative, not because "Physics is stupid". This stuff has to be discovered, it doesn't just pop into our knowledge.
#9
Quote by Jokaaa
Yeah strange. ^^

A sentence with "anliegen"... "An diesem Punkt liegt eine Spannung von 12V an."

this point is connected to a power source of 12V?
#10
a current is a flow of charged particles, with the unit Coulomb represented by C which is Charge per second. Cs^-1

and i think voltage is energy per unit charge, which is Joules per Coulomb, JC^-1
#11
Quote by magnus_maximus
Charge is reprecented by Q. C is heat capacity.


Units are Coulombs, C.

EDIT: Just like Energy is shortened to E, but the units are Joules, J.
Last edited by br33dlove at Jun 7, 2010,
#12
But in an equation charge is Q
If you're reading this, then chances are you're procrastinating too
#13
Quote by magnus_maximus
I edited.


Ah, I see what you were pointing out now. Thanks for the clarification though.
#14
Quote by CoreysMonster
this point is connected to a power source of 12V?


Hm I don't know if there is circuit with some resistors for example, and somewhere in there, there is a point with 12V, it isn't really connected to a source... ^^

But another question: Is there a word for the protection from wrong polarity (DC circuit)? For example a simple diode would be such a protection, or also a fuse, shorted via a diode. The German word is "Verpolschutz".
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#15
The current is a flow of electrons along a wire (or any medium to be precise). Although each individual electron is moving really slowly, it pushes the next one as it moves- kind of like having a tube full of tennis balls. If you insert a ball at one end, it will push one out the other end, making it appear to be instantaneous. This is why we see lightning happen so quickly.

The voltage is the 'potential difference'. It's best to think of it as being in a crowd. You want to gain more space, so you move away from the crowd, towards the smaller potential (less people). The closer you are to the potential, the more you want to move away from it, the faster you will move. A high voltage is like having a large group.

It is this potential which makes the electrons move (although thermal energy also adds to this in random directions). As two electrons approach each other, they create another potential, as the first electron is 'pushed' by one potential, the potential between the two 'pushes' the next electron and so on.

Edit: A DC current only works one way, as the potential is static (it doesnt move like in AC currents), therefore it will only push the electrons in one direction, so no need for a diode to make it flow only one way.
Last edited by l3vity at Jun 7, 2010,
#16
Quote by Jokaaa
Hm I don't know if there is circuit with some resistors for example, and somewhere in there, there is a point with 12V, it isn't really connected to a source... ^^

But another question: Is there a word for the protection from wrong polarity (DC circuit)? For example a simple diode would be such a protection, or also a fuse, shorted via a diode. The German word is "Verpolschutz".

urgh, that's a tough one. I learned all of these things in german, too, so it's really hard to translate.

I'll come back if I can think of it.
#17
Quote by l3vity

Edit: A DC current only works one way, as the potential is static (it doesnt move like in AC currents), therefore it will only push the electrons in one direction, so no need for a diode to make it flow only one way.


Not if there is an end-user, who just connects two cables wrong, + and ground.
But I already found the term, it's reverse polarity protection!

Thanks for your help!
But feel free to keep up the discussion about electrons and where they want to go to.
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#18
^

The word that comes to mind for me is circuit breaker, but I could be wrong because I didn't learn any of the words in German
#19
My dictionary says, a circuit breaker is a Leistungsschutzschalter... That's quite a lot heavier stuff.
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#20
sorry, i just misread what you were asking. I thought you were asking why a dc circuit would only flow one way, not how an alternating current is converted to a direct current. i should learn to read more thoroughly lol
#21
Haha, no problem. ^^
I'm done now... for today... xD
Thanks for your help! ;D
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#22
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
^

The word that comes to mind for me is circuit breaker, but I could be wrong because I didn't learn any of the words in German

nah, that's something quite different