#1
As it says on the tin really... I have a Jackson DX10D and need to restring, but don't know what gauge they put on in the factory.

Don't wanna have to re-do the intonation and the tremolo etc!!!! Mainly because I don't know how and can't afford to take it to a tech

Thanks in advance for the help
#3
9's
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#4
google?
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#5
Most guitars come from the factory with .009 gauge strings so I wouldn't doubt if Jackson did the same.
#6
If I put 10's on and it were 9's, would that mean setting the intonation again? Is there a big difference?

I have another guitar with 10's on, and I can't really tell a massive difference between the top E's, but perhaps that's cos the difference is so slight...
#8
Quote by ImaginaryEvil
If I put 10's on and it were 9's, would that mean setting the intonation again? Is there a big difference?

I have another guitar with 10's on, and I can't really tell a massive difference between the top E's, but perhaps that's cos the difference is so slight...


If your Dinky is the model with the Floyd Rose, then you are going to have to set up the bridge for that string gauge. Does your guitar have a Floating trem or a fixed bridge?
You can call me Aaron.


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#9
Almost certainly 9s. If you really can't adjust the trem and the intonation yourself, buy a set of 9s and 10s and put the 9s on first.
You really should know how to intonate and adjust the trem, though. It's not difficult to learn and then you won't have to worry about things like this.
#10
It's got a Floyd Rose.

I know how to restring it, but not how to intonate (I can intonate a fixed bridge, no worries, but that doesn't help me here lol)
#11
Quote by ImaginaryEvil
It's got a Floyd Rose.

I know how to restring it, but not how to intonate (I can intonate a fixed bridge, no worries, but that doesn't help me here lol)

It's the same principle, just different mechanics... There's a thread on this at the top of these forums.

IMO, if you want to have 10's, get 10's. Don't be afraid of the trem work, just look up how to do it.
#12
I have a guitar with an OFR and I've gone from 9's in standard to 10's in standard to 11's in D and just today I went to 11's in standard. Checked my intonation and it was absolutely perfect without ever being adjusted
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#13
Quote by GNR4EVER
I have a guitar with an OFR and I've gone from 9's in standard to 10's in standard to 11's in D and just today I went to 11's in standard. Checked my intonation and it was absolutely perfect without ever being adjusted

Please tell me you did adjust the tremolo angle...?
#14
Quote by Y00p
Please tell me you did adjust the tremolo angle...?


Of course That took quite a bit of adjusting (And a fourth spring) but I got it.

I was prepared to adjust the intonation...there just turned out to be nothing to adjust.
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#15
had a good read through the sticky
however I'm wondering a couple of things... what does the intonation tool do?
and if my strings are 1/2 a semitone flat and I put them back up to pitch, should I need to adjust the tremolo angle?
#16
Quote by ImaginaryEvil
had a good read through the sticky
however I'm wondering a couple of things... what does the intonation tool do?
and if my strings are 1/2 a semitone flat and I put them back up to pitch, should I need to adjust the tremolo angle?


Intonation is what makes the pitch correct on all frets. A guitar that isn't intonated can be tuned perfect with the open strings, but when you fret it, the notes will either be a little sharp or flat. Adjust the intonation moves the saddles slightly which increases or decrease the actual length of the string from the nut to the bridge.

If it went out of tune then the bridge probably is a little off. Whammy the bar a couple times, full dumps, full pull backs, and check to see if it's out of tune again. If it is post back and we'll go from there.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#17
Quote by biga29
Intonation is what makes the pitch correct on all frets. A guitar that isn't intonated can be tuned perfect with the open strings, but when you fret it, the notes will either be a little sharp or flat. Adjust the intonation moves the saddles slightly which increases or decrease the actual length of the string from the nut to the bridge.

If it went out of tune then the bridge probably is a little off. Whammy the bar a couple times, full dumps, full pull backs, and check to see if it's out of tune again. If it is post back and we'll go from there.


hey

I meant more the tool that you use to adjust the intonation, it mentions it in the sticky... can't figure out how it works

ok, as soon as daylight hits I'll whammy the bar and see what happens, and post back... (the Mrs is asleep and I would get the evil eye of doom if I made any noise hehe)

thanks for taking time to help me on this one. I'm a total noob with FR's
#19
Hi Biga29

I've done a few dumps and pulls on the bar, and the axe is still perfectly in tune yaaay

I have yet another question - why does the brand of strings make a difference to the intonation?
#21
Go to Jackson's official website and look up your guitar and then go to the link that shows the stats for the guitar and it will tell you what strings came on it.
#22
Thanks guys

Just wondering, but what difference does the brand of strings make to the intonation?
#23
Quote by ImaginaryEvil
Thanks guys

Just wondering, but what difference does the brand of strings make to the intonation?


I am not sure,but I think it does..