#1
O.k. don't get mad, but I'm gonna lead with a modal question. When you play using modes, the difference between C ionian and D dorian is that in each you resolve to the respective root, right?

If so how would tension and resolution be created to resolve to the root? Is it simmilar to doing it with chord progressions?

I'm sorry if I'm completely off base, this is a topic that I've been trying to grasp for a while. If I'm wrong don't be too afraid of hurting my feelings.
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#2
Quote by Unlockitall
O.k. don't get mad, but I'm gonna lead with a modal question. When you play using modes, the difference between C ionian and D dorian is that in each you resolve to the respective root, right?


correct.

Quote by Unlockitall
If so how would tension and resolution be created to resolve to the root? Is it simmilar to doing it with chord progressions?


quite frankly, the same way you would in tonal music. in traditional modality, you don't have such a thing as modal chord progressions, but in modern modality, the idea is very real -- just be sure not to connote the feel of the relative major or minor (i.e. if you're in D dorian, watch that it doesn't start to sound like C major or A minor).
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#3
there is actually some kind of modal thread or something like that already...and the truth is you can ask this question a million times and never get the right answer, the fastest way if to find some one who actually knows and for them to show you. I myself still have no clue as I have been trying to figure it out for a while.

I have heard so many different things I am pretty much confused about it. It may be helpful to find some examples that use Dorian as well as the other modes to help out.
#4
O.k thanks, but the part that I don't know how to do is the creating of tension and resolution. It has something to do with the intervals you play, right.
"His name is Robert Paulson"
#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
correct.


quite frankly, the same way you would in tonal music. in traditional modality, you don't have such a thing as modal chord progressions, but in modern modality, the idea is very real -- just be sure not to connote the feel of the relative major or minor (i.e. if you're in D dorian, watch that it doesn't start to sound like C major or A minor).

The only way it would sound like C major would be if there was a C major chord underneath the scale.

Same with A minor, or any other mode. It depends on which chords are being played underneath the lead.
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#6
Quote by GoIrish668
The only way it would sound like C major would be if there was a C major chord underneath the scale.


not true at all. you could write a composition in C major without using a single C. in fact, i believe there was talk about something similar in a recent thread.

EDIT: found it -

Quote by The_Sophist
I had a freind that wrote a song that didin't have a single Bb in it and was written in Bb. It actually resolved to it to, I was dumbfounded.


you have to watch out for implied tonal centers. just because you're not playing it doesn't mean it's not there. tonally ambiguous music is another matter entirely, however.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 8, 2010,
#7
Quote by GoIrish668
The only way it would sound like C major would be if there was a C major chord underneath the scale.

Same with A minor, or any other mode. It depends on which chords are being played underneath the lead.


Ahh, I see, you are doing that magical "C major scale changes with different chords" thing. That would explain the first curious statement and the second statement randomly mentioning A minor and modes.

Well it doesn't change sorry. If the key is C major, you will be using that C major scale over all the different chords, and it's not going to change its name.
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#8
To learn how modal chord progressions work, go to the modes sticky and it's one of those thinks, probably the last one.

It shouldn't be too bad for you at this point because you're past the hardest part: understanding the role of the tonic. We (humans) find a tonic subconsciously and there is only so much you can do to give it hints. That's covered with modal progressions and drone notes are also very effective. Aside from that, nothing is consistently effective.
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#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
precisely. if you play D dorian and it sounds like C ionian, then it's C ionian - you're simply resolving to the wrong root.

traditionally, modes are in the realm of melody, but with modern modality, using chords in a modal context is becoming pretty common (where modes exist, at least). just keep an eye on your resolution - make sure it's going to D rather than C.


emphasize can mean whatever you want it to mean, but i wouldn't go with the b3 and b7 - that'll just make it sound like a pentatonic scale. emphasize the b3 and the natural 6. just make them stand out - make sure the listener knows it's not in a major or minor key.

just watch your harmony. if you're not careful, it might start to sound like it's in C major rather than D dorian. in modal composition, harmony is everything.


This is from a different thread, but this was the kind of answer I was looking for. I figured I'd quote it hear in case someone wondering what I was read this thread.
"His name is Robert Paulson"