#1
So I'll go ahead and give you the specs of my setup then I'll explain the problem.

Epiphone Les Paul with generic brand pickups.
Line 6 Spider III 15 (when I'm at home messing around)
Peavey Bandit 112 (at practice and gigs)
Occassionally I use my Digitech Whammy pedal.

The thing is, I want to be able to create/control a good, strong feedback, but I can't figure out how. Sometimes I get it on accident, but I can't seem to do it on purpose.
The accidental feedback occurs more through my Peavey than my Spider. I assume that's because the Peavey's bigger and it's always turned up considerably louder.
The sound I'm looking for is found in Smells Like Teen Spirit (the third verse, after the solo). You know what I'm talking about?
How can I purposely produce this effect and effectively control it?
Tips and advice are greatly appreciated!!! Thanks!

P.S. I am fully aware of the controversy behind the Spider III (and I guess the other Spiders, too). Let's PLEASE not talk about that. I just use around the house.
#2
bump
i also would love to know how to achieve a sound like this short of turning my amp up full and standing right next to the amp
#3
Quote by jacksonDKMG
bump
i also would love to know how to achieve a sound like this short of turning my amp up full and standing right next to the amp


See, even that doesn't work for me. I mean, guitarists all the time use feedback at gigs and you don't see them standing right next their amp. They run all over the stage and the feedback works great. Why can't I can't get mine to work at all??
I don't even really know how to do it. Ugh.

Again, tips and advice are greatly appreciated!
#4
Get rid of both amps
Buy a tube amp
Turn it up very loud.

Solid state feedback doesn't tend to sound very nice, the Spider will sound god-awful - I had a Bandit and the feedback didn't sound all that great. You tend to get that musica, singing feedback from tube amps, it's also easier to control because they don't clip so aggressively.

Feedback is a physical effect, the sound waves from your speaker perpetuate the vibrations of the strings. If your amp isn't loud enough there's not going to be enough energy coming from the speakers to do that. To control it you need to change the position and angle of the guitar as that's going to change how the soundwaves interact with the strings. Likewise fretting in different places will change feedback as you'r echanging the length of string that's free to vibrate.

Guys in bands get feedback because they're playing at ear-splitting volumes, have speakers all over the place and spend time in the soundcheck scoping out the stage to find the best spots for feedback.

Have a listen to the the distorted amp clips in my profile, the feedback in those is simply down to having the amp turned up damned loud.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 8, 2010,
#5
Aah. I never really knew the difference between tube amps and solid states.
Seagull, you mind recommending a good tube amp that fits at middle-class teenager's budget?
#6
Don't get me wrong, some solid state amps feed back fine but a lot of the time it tends to be overly shrill and fizzy and escalates too quickly to be usable - tube amps generally do the ethereal howling thing much better. What kind of budget you looking at?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
Actually, first can you tell me how much a Bandit and a Spider would sell for?
Or how I can find out?