#1
im learning theory out of a book and ive done building ascending but descending is all backwards and confusing and my book doesnt explain is very well.

my book says " count down the number of letter names indicated by the quantity. now meassure the distance from the lower note back to the upper. if the upper note belongs to the major scale of the lower note and the desired interval is perfect of major, the process is complete. if not, adjust the lower note up or down to achive the proper quality"


one of the questions is what would a minor 7th of F# be. i thought it would of bean a G (i was using the ascending methord instead of the descending)

if you could explain it a little better that would ge great, thanks.
better shred than dead
#2
If you're trying to find it from a Major scale and flatten it. start with an easier key to deal with.....

Example in C

C D E F G A B C

B = M7 of C
Bb = m7 of C



If you want to do it in F#, make sure you know the key sig.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 8, 2010,
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
If you're trying to find it from a Major scale and flatten it. start with an easier key to deal with.....

Example in C

C D E F G A B C

B = M7 of C
Bb = m7 of C



If you want to do it in F#, make sure you know the key sig.
That's an ascending minor 7th, I think TS means a descending minor 7th.

I think this is what the book means. Intervals are always measured from the lowest note, so when you are descending and you have the first note you still have to measure from the lowest note (the second note). So the interval (in this case the minor 7th) is in relation to the lowest note, even though you are given the highest note.

This means that when it says "Find the descending minor 7th of F#" (or however they phrased it) they mean "What note is F# the minor 7th interval above.

Hopefully that made some sense.

So to get the descending melodic interval you can follow their technique. Take F# major scale:

F# G# A# B C# D# E# F#

Now count back seven steps (including the F# as one step, as F# to F# is a unison). You get G#. Now take the G# major scale:

G# A# B# C# D# E# Fx G#

Fx is the major 7th of G#, so you know that F# is the minor seventh. So you have now found your answer, G#.

I think that's correct, could somebody confirm/brutally crush me with knowledge?
#4
^ You can just go the opposite way through the scale for descending intervals. and adjust in the same way (but again opposite).

What you wrote will also give you the same answer. (equally valid approach)

I still suggest starting with a more reasonable key for the TS. Then gradually try sigs with more sharps or flats.


Also, I strongly suggest becoming familiar with the interval shape & sound.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 8, 2010,
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ Thats the right idea..... you just go the opposite way through the scale for descending intervals.

I still suggest starting with a more reasonable key for the TS. Then gradually try sigs with more sharps or flats.

Also, I strongly suggest becoming familiar with the interval shape & sound.
But isn't your first example of Bb being the minor 7th of C just an ascending interval? If C was higher so the interval was descending wouldn't it be a major 2nd?
#6
Quote by 12345abcd3
But isn't your first example of Bb being the minor 7th of C just an ascending interval? If C was higher so the interval was descending wouldn't it be a major 2nd?


ummm.... YES........ IT ........WAS. (LOL)


It was clearly described as ascending. I even wrote out the scale and showed it.

Like I just said, if you want descending, do the same thing.... except everything is opposite.
(descend through the scale 7 steps..... adjust by 1/2 step).

Your suggestion gets you to the same answer.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 8, 2010,
#7
A m7 below C is a D. I chose to do this by knowing the inversions of all of the intervals. M7 down is a m2 up. m7 down is a M2 up. M6 down is a m3 up... and so on. It's note really that hard to memorize since you only have to memorize up to the tritone which is the same ascending or descending.
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Jun 8, 2010,
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
ummm.... YES........ IT ........WAS. (LOL)


It was clearly described as ascending. I even wrote out the scale and showed it.

Like I just said, if you want descending, do the same thing.... except everything is opposite.
(descend through the scale 7 steps..... adjust by 1/2 step).

Your suggestion gets you to the same answer.
Ok, cool, I get it.
#9
Quote by Eastwinn
A m7 below C is a D. I chose to do this by knowing the inversions of all of the intervals. M7 down is a m2 up. m7 down is a M2 up. M6 down is a m3 up... and so on. It's note really that hard to memorize since you only have to memorize up to the tritone which is the same ascending or descending.

^ thats a good way as well.


I think the TS is still figuring out what intervals are though, so its good to be able to visualize the distances in the scale. But yeah, once you know what they are, there are lots of ways to internalize them.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 8, 2010,
#10
a minor seventh above F# is E, and a minor seventh below F# is G#.

honestly, i completely understand intervals, and even i found your book's explanation to be a bit convoluted. 12345abcd3 gave a pretty good explanation, but keep munky's and eastwinn's suggestions in mind.
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