#1
So recently, I have been working on singing. I seem to be able to reach a G note (3rd note on the highest string of a guitar), but never past that. Ive gathered through listening to songs that that's not very high.

So, Id love to be able to sing reaaaaly high. Kinda like Stockdale.

The thing is, I can reach the really high notes easily if I use, hell, lets call it 'the back of my throat'. But it comes out weak, and not at all how its sung.

Basically, my question, how the hell does Axl and Andrew or even Geddy Lee do it?

Thanks
Brasil.

Quote by Daneeka
I heard there is uranium gas in the tubes. So you could easily make a little nuclear blast. If i were you, i wouldn't want to start the World War III.




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#2
falsetto i guess.
Ibanez RGT6EXFX -> Ibanez TS9 -> Korg Pitchblack -> Peavey 5150 II head -> Mesa Rectifier 2x12 cab
#3
To be honest, they were probably born with the ability to do it. But, you can train yourself with breathing exercises and/or professional vocal training. Google breathing exercises for singers and get started.

But if you really want to do vocals (without being born with excellent natural ability), seriously consider formal training, it can really help.
Gear:
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#4
Quote by alexdoabismo
The thing is, I can reach the really high notes easily if I use, hell, lets call it 'the back of my throat'. But it comes out weak, and not at all how its sung.
Plus straining your throat is harmful to your vocal chords. This is the absolute worst place to direct your resonance. You should feel like the sound is coming out of the top of your head. This requires better diaphragm support and posture (although more so in your neck/face than in your back, which is also pretty important).

I suggest trying to find a vocal instructor. A qualified instructor will start to teach you these things probably right off the bat.

Although if this somehow isn't an option, we may be able to help you out a bit.

Quote by alexdoabismo
So recently, I have been working on singing. I seem to be able to reach a G note (3rd note on the highest string of a guitar), but never past that. Ive gathered through listening to songs that that's not very high.
If it's any consolation, I'd kill to be able to hit that G (G4) consistently. Sure I'm a baritone in my choir, but my range suggests more that I'm a bass. My range is about D2 to F#4 comfortably on a good day. Sometimes I can hit that baritone G4 but that's usually pushing it.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 8, 2010,
#5
Quote by Eskil Rask
falsetto i guess.


what is that? because it hink it might be what im doing now
Brasil.

Quote by Daneeka
I heard there is uranium gas in the tubes. So you could easily make a little nuclear blast. If i were you, i wouldn't want to start the World War III.




THE SHORT BACK AND SIDES !!!

Fender Jaguar HH
Digitech RP355
#6
Quote by alexdoabismo
what is that? because it hink it might be what im doing now


Yeah that is what you're doing now. Falsetto technically means "false voice" or something like that, but it's when you sing from the throat, not the chest.
Gear:
Agile Septor Pro 727 EB Nat Ash
ESP/LTD Deluxe MH-1000NT
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Line 6 Spider Valve HD100 Head
Vox 4x12 Cabinet
#7
You should get a professional teacher to identify your full voice range. As mentioned above, it's probably likely that Stockdale's range may go higher than yours, and the upside is that you can sing lower than him.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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