#1
Evening UG.

I restrung my Schecter with FR bridge for the 3rd time tonight. It all went accordingly until i started to tune up, it won't stay in tune, no matter how many times i try it. Even after 20 or 30 times tuning it, it may finally get in tune, but the bridge will have rose too much for the setup to be perfect. I've fiddled with the springs, and i can't manage to get the bridge sitting evenly when the strings are in tune.

What do?
- Note that i have changed from .9-46 to .13-56 gauge
#3
loosen the springs behind the cavity.
also, tighten the truss rod (clockwise on most guitars) a quarter of a turn to make up for extra string tension.
Last edited by heminder at Jun 9, 2010,
#4
Quote by heminder
loosen the springs behind the cavity.
also, tighten the truss rod (clockwise on most guitars) a quarter of a turn.

Turning the truss rod will help with the bridge being pulled forward right?

I might just block the FR off for the moment
#5
Quote by andy_h04
Turning the truss rod will help with the bridge being pulled forward right?

I might just block the FR off for the moment

no, the screws behind the cavity take care of the bridge .
the truss rod affects the neck curvature. the higher tension of the 13s you put on will make the neck want to bow forward a bit. truss tod remedies that.

there should be a guitar setup thread somewhere...
#6
Going from .9 to .13 is a HUGE difference in tension, You'll have to add another spring or 2 in the back of your guitar to make it lay level.

You'll have killer fret buzz as well if you had any kind of decent setup on your guitar. You'll have to raise your bridge and possible adjust the truss rod some.

And finally, you'll have to set your intonation again.
#7
Quote by iduno871
Going from .9 to .13 is a HUGE difference in tension, You'll have to add another spring or 2 in the back of your guitar to make it lay level.

You'll have killer fret buzz as well if you had any kind of decent setup on your guitar. You'll have to raise your bridge and possible adjust the truss rod some.

And finally, you'll have to set your intonation again.


this..
#8
Quote by iduno871
Going from .9 to .13 is a HUGE difference in tension, You'll have to add another spring or 2 in the back of your guitar to make it lay level.

You'll have killer fret buzz as well if you had any kind of decent setup on your guitar. You'll have to raise your bridge and possible adjust the truss rod some.

And finally, you'll have to set your intonation again.

I was assuming i'd need another spring, although my friend has an esp tuned down to drop b, and he only has 2 springs, though his neck has a larger scale i believe.

Would 4 or 5 springs be better?
#9
I think everyone is not correct.

If your changine gauge and drop tuning, you should be fine with your current springs.

You CANNOT tune the strings, and THEN adjust the screws in the back. Each time you adjust the screws, your changing string tension.

Here's what you do:

1. Block the floyd from recceding into the body, and so that it's right where you want it to be when in tune. Use can use a pencil or 9 volt or something.

2. Tighten the screws in the back

3. Tune to what ever tuning you want to use. If the bridge starts to rise (and if the pencil or whatever you used to block the bridge falls out), tighten the springs in the back. If you tighten them all the way and it's still rising, you need more springs.

4. Slowly loosen the strings in the back until what ever you used either slips out easly, or BARELY falls out.

5. Lock the nut and use the fine tuners for adjustment.

6. Rawk out with your cawk out.
Guitars:
LTD Alexi-600 White & Black
LTD Alexi-200 Black(Death Adder pickup & Gold OFR)
Agile Interceptor Pro 727 7-string
Jackson JS30RR rhoads
Jackson DKMGT
Squire telecaster

amps:
Bugera 6262 212 loaded with WGS veteran 30's
#10
Quote by Gundamnitpete
I think everyone is not correct.

If your changine gauge and drop tuning, you should be fine with your current springs.

You CANNOT tune the strings, and THEN adjust the screws in the back. Each time you adjust the screws, your changing string tension.

Here's what you do:

1. Block the floyd from recceding into the body, and so that it's right where you want it to be when in tune. Use can use a pencil or 9 volt or something.

2. Tighten the screws in the back

3. Tune to what ever tuning you want to use. If the bridge starts to rise (and if the pencil or whatever you used to block the bridge falls out), tighten the springs in the back. If you tighten them all the way and it's still rising, you need more springs.

4. Slowly loosen the strings in the back until what ever you used either slips out easly, or BARELY falls out.

5. Lock the nut and use the fine tuners for adjustment.

6. Rawk out with your cawk out.


Thanks for the help
I'll go out and pick up some more springs tomorrow, since at max tension the bridge is still rising.