#1
Hi eveyone, as I've already said a million times before, I'm looking to buy a new amp, and one thing i was wondering was is there any tonal differnce between a 10 inch speaker and a 12 inch speaker? Thanx in advance.
#2
Well i don't really know the difference too much except for volume but i have a Laney VC15 which has a 10 inch speaker and it sounds amazing.
My gear:
  • Fender American Standard Telecaster
  • Ibanez RG450
  • Laney VC15
  • Electro Harmonix HOG
  • Vox Satchurator
  • Blackout Effectors Musket fuzz
  • Electro Harmonix Pulsar
  • Earthquaker Devices Disaster Transport
  • Malekko Chicklett

#4
the 12 will be more bassy and the 10 will likely have more midrange.
Chelsea FC



Quote by Blues Hippie
As for the swim team member that drowned, it just means the swim team just got a lot better. Same with him too, it's time to move on, the weakest link is gone...
#5
well general public opinion is that a 12" speaker sounds more "full" compared to a smaller speaker.

a smaller speaker sounds tighter than a larger speaker.

it's like comparing a 1x12 and a 4x12. the 4x12 sounds more full, but less focused as compared to just using a single 12" speaker.
#6
The peak frequency response is higher in a 10" speaker. If you say "ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh" and then go straight into saying "EEEEEEEEEEEEEE" you will notice the pich of your voice changes. That is the type of change in focuse that your speaker gets. This ultimately means you get tighter low end and a punchier tone from a 10" speaker. 12" speakers have more low end but it's not as defined so you get a smoother tone for a 12".
#8
Quote by smmSTV
what about a 15' speaker(if they even have that for guitar)?



not 100% sure but i once heard Dimebag state that he used 15''s in his Warhead as a way to get better articulation from his lower notes. But as i said i dont know...i just know you get more bass, bottom end or whatever from larger speakers
Crank your rig on 12, let it feedback wide-open for a good two minutes, freak your neighbors out and ENJOY THE POWER OF THE GUITAR! 'Oh, what a feeling,' and it ain't no damned Toyota!" ----Dimebag Darrell
#9
The differences between two different 10" speakers or two 12's are greater then the average difference between the two different sizes. Judge them for what they sound like don't rule out a nice sounding speaker just because it is the wrong size.
#10
I have always said that 12" always sounds best with guitar but having said that I'll say this; Clapton recorded one of the most defining guitar tone albums of all time (Beano) using his original custom built by Jim Marshall Bluesbreaker combo loaded with 4x10" - so what do I know?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#11
the difference is in the surface areas of the cone and mass. a larger speaker has more surface area, this allows it to move more air with the same excursion, unfortunately larger speakers have more difficulty moving the increased mass of the speaker at higher frequencies.

as stated before, this makes bigger speakers for ideal for low end, and smaller speakers more appropriate for high end.

in hifi applications it is popular to use a cross-over system to isolate frequencies in the signal and send them to appropriate speakers. like a 3-way cab may have a 12", 6" and a horn or tweeter, with the 12" getting the low notes, the 6" getting the mids and tweeter getting the highs. this makes for more accurate signal reproduction.

also mentioned earlier, more speakers make a 'bigger' or 'more full' sound. this is because of a number of phenomenon. speakers wired in parallel (espcially speakers of different size) tend to smooth the signal, speakers wired in parallel will also increase effective speaker surface area which allows better low end reproduction while maintaining it's high end capabilities. this is how 4x10 cabs give so much low end, but porting may also be used in these cabs.

guitars work in the ~80 hz to 1280 hz range, and a 12" speaker covers that quite well, but there are also plenty of other speaker combinations that can cover that freq range quite easily. these different speaker setups will be more responsive in particular freq ranges and that will define why they sound different.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Jun 10, 2010,
#13
Quote by AcousticMirror
Gumbi we need to get 10 of these wired together.
http://www.magnepan.com/model_MMG


the problem is that hooking up too many speakers in parallel will lower the impedance beyond usefulness.

nice link, i have been wondering whats up with ribbon speakers for a while, dunno if they are good or what. guess so, but no one uses them for signal sourcing.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#15
ya series.
I dunno their like 599 for a pair with a 30 day money back guarantee.
That's cheaper then 2 alincos...

25 days later

uh sorry...these really didn't work with the amp I had.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#16
25 days later,
"these things don't like it when you hook them up to an SLO and work feedback like Ted Nugent do they? Please take them back, they smell funny."
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#17
The other guitarist in my band and I both use Fender Hot Rod Devilles. Mine has 2 12's and his has 4 10's. In a live situation, his speakers have a bit more midrange punch while mine have a more defined low-end. It isn't a super different sound, but it's nice to have the slightly contrasting tones, especially in unison.
#19
Well I currently have a combo with an 8" speaker(which i'm trying to get rid of), and i heard somewhere that anything smaller than 10 inches dosen't really count as a reliable speaker. Will an 8" speaker really degrade sound quality?
#20
Quote by smmSTV
Well I currently have a combo with an 8" speaker(which i'm trying to get rid of), and i heard somewhere that anything smaller than 10 inches dosen't really count as a reliable speaker. Will an 8" speaker really degrade sound quality?

It just has trouble hitting the lower frequencies effectively, so it really can't reproduce guitar tones completely.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#21
Quote by smmSTV
Well I currently have a combo with an 8" speaker(which i'm trying to get rid of), and i heard somewhere that anything smaller than 10 inches dosen't really count as a reliable speaker. Will an 8" speaker really degrade sound quality?



I wouldn't say that "reliable" is the right word to use. 8" speakers are every bit as reliable as larger speakers. The issue with the 8" speaker is down to the type of tone you get from a speaker that small. One of the most popular and sought after amps in history is the Fender Champ 800 and that only has an 8" speaker! An even more popular amp, but less sought after now days was the vintage champ 600 which only had a 6" speaker. Blues players today love the old champs and swear that much of the mojo is in the speaker. What you need to think about is the tone you like, the amp your are connecting it to, and the types of music you want to play. If you are after a early 60's blues rock tone and you have a champ then an 8" speaker isn't a bad way to go. If you want a more well rounded blues rock tone then go with a 10" or 12" instead. If you want to forget blues and jazz and stick to pop, alternative and metal then you probably want to go with a 12" speaker. It's all about the application.
#22
^+1... smmSTV you've done everything right man, but this is kind of getting old. You've got like 4 threads open right now that you won't stop bumping with extremely general questions. The answer to all of them; it varies. Can we be done now?
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#23
I have a 4x8 speaker cab, and the tone is all treble. I mean, it sounds good, but definitely not for metal or anything like that.
#24
well in a cab you can laod it up wit a bunch of speakers. for a combo? i wouldnt get on any stage with anything less than a 1x12. if we are talking about a single speaker, dont go smaller than a 12" unless you want a practice amp.
#25
Quote by forsaknazrael
10s have more punch and a faster attack to them. They can sound just as tight and thick as a 12", btw. It's not like they're lacking in bass....They're often the speaker of choice for bassists!


10" speakers are often prefered by bass players because they have less bass response, which means a tighter overall tone.
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#27
^you are right. The resonate frequency is higher so the smaller speakers are less likely to get flabby but they still produce the low frequencies. Plus the quicker response from the smaller speakers also help keep your tone solid so again, it's not that they can't get the low frequencies, it's just that the low frequencies are tighter, more controlled, and punchy.