#1
I recently stumbled on this article with Thom Yorke, and it got me thinking....

http://blogs.chron.com/celebritybuzz/2010/06/radiohead_frontman_music_indus.html

So if the record labels go bust, what's your thoughts on the future of music? Better or worse? What are the pros and cons? Would it lead to an increase in musicians or a decrease, and would some bands die out while others remain afloat?

EDIT: I just realized the same article was on UG's homepage....still though, what do you think?
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Last edited by EvilAngel93 at Jun 9, 2010,
#2
Better for the musical talents and musical culture of the population.

Worst for the economy and for the income of musicians (well, about that, won't really change anything, won't it? )
#3
There was music before it, there will be music after it.
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#4
Quote by damian_91
There was music before it, there will be music after it.

No, all those musicians will simply explode.
#7
You will see many more musicians finding new ways to market their music.

Touring will be more essential of course, and networking sites will become an ever more important factor when it comes for bands marketing their music.

I believe that more cultural scenes will show up, people will listen to more local music than before.

Just my theory
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#8
Quote by The_Casinator
No, all those musicians will simply explode.

ROFL!
If it's creative, true to your musical goal, and it sounds good, put it in the song.

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#11
I don't think independent music (by which I mean independently released) will actually go "under" like major labels appear to be. Mainly because an independent label usually offers something further than music as a product, but also partially because they are run on much smaller (and therefore sustainable) budgets. As independents are usually smaller companies, and therefore run in a much more personal manner this shouldn't cause huge problems for bands to get signed, or to make money from their music, it just changes the dynamics of the money making process away from mass market commercial products towards more niche products. Whether that is positive or not is debatable, as a good pop song has the ability unite people (e.g. the beatles and motown) but the drive to make "marketable" songs has led to increasing homogeneity (e.g. ke$ha et al...) and less innovative music.
#12
Quote by The_Casinator
No, all those musicians will simply explode.


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Wait.



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#13
Money for promotion of a band will come perhaps from private investors.
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#14
You'll have to work and do it all yourselves. There won't be any sort of organized promotion and venue circuit; artists are going to have to write, finance, maybe record, book, promote and negotiate for themselves, just like any good indie artist. Personally I think it'd be for the best. You can still make music, you just have to do a lot more to be paid for it.
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#15
Quote by kublaikhan
I don't think independent music (by which I mean independently released) will actually go "under" like major labels appear to be. Mainly because an independent label usually offers something further than music as a product, but also partially because they are run on much smaller (and therefore sustainable) budgets. As independents are usually smaller companies, and therefore run in a much more personal manner this shouldn't cause huge problems for bands to get signed, or to make money from their music, it just changes the dynamics of the money making process away from mass market commercial products towards more niche products. Whether that is positive or not is debatable, as a good pop song has the ability unite people (e.g. the beatles and motown) but the drive to make "marketable" songs has led to increasing homogeneity (e.g. ke$ha et al...) and less innovative music.

its noticeable in the "fine art world" that there has been a big shift in the past 20 years from the mass produced Andy warhol style pop art to more limited production. with it the change to more conceptual works like Michael Landys stuff. and with that people feel more of a spiritual connection to their work(and the works of others) as it feels more important.
not sure how it will work with music which relies more on mass production


Quote by necrosis1193
You'll have to work and do it all yourselves. There won't be any sort of organized promotion and venue circuit; artists are going to have to write, finance, maybe record, book, promote and negotiate for themselves, just like any good indie artist. Personally I think it'd be for the best. You can still make music, you just have to do a lot more to be paid for it.

eventually musicians will make enough to pay others to do jobs for them and the whole cycle starts again
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Last edited by Ikey at Jun 9, 2010,
#16
It'll be much harder for an artist to make it big, and there will be less of a uniform popular music, but it will be easier for an unknown artist to become more popular then now. Tastes will diverge more. And all the people who are non-musicians employed in the industry will lose their jobs.
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#17
Anyone else find it strange that Thom Yorke, the guy who made all his money and publicity, is saying that losing the music industry will be "No great loss"?
#18
well, it is an industry with very greedy people at the top, so i guess it will be better in that sense.

musicians will still find a way to get things done independently.
the jobs that need doing now will still need doing then.
Last edited by heminder at Jun 9, 2010,