#1
So heres my deal. I like writing songs, but I have trouble utilizing scales. I have to look all over the fretboard to find the notes I can use then have to try and remember them to use with other notes. Whats the best way to use scales in writing music?? Is it patterns? cause thats what it seems like to me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
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Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#2
Quote by Slapp62
So heres my deal. I like writing songs, but I have trouble utilizing scales. I have to look all over the fretboard to find the notes I can use then have to try and remember them to use with other notes. Whats the best way to use scales in writing music?? Is it patterns? cause thats what it seems like to me.


patterns have their place, but i'd argue that they're far from the best use. i'd say that the best way to use scales in music is to create melodies.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
my problem is creating those melodies
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#4
Quote by Slapp62
my problem is creating those melodies


contrary to what some people might believe, creating melodies is a craft - it's something you have to work at. sometimes, melodies are even refined after creation.

just play around a bit - pay close attention to your note choice and your rhythm. most importantly, really listen to what you're doing.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
but that doesnt answer HOW to create the melodies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#6
When I make melodies, I always start out humming what I want, and then after I have the basic idea of what I'm writing, I put it on the guitar, tweak it, and get the tabs written down. After that, I take a break for about a day, and then go back to it with a fresh perspective thing, and fix up what needs to be fixed.

For your original question, I use scales for pretty much the whole song. I like to start with the melodies, but after that, I use scales to make some simple riffs that would sound good in the song. After I have that, I find out what chords work with the scale I'm using, and put those in as a back up. I also use scales to make sure the entire song, with every instrument is in key.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#7
If you think of music as a series of Chords which in fact it is indeed, Scales will carry too much info, eg 'notes' and although all the notes of the scale if played for the proper Key will be 'right' notes, some of them when played over a particular chord may not sound as good as some other notes. Why? Because the particular chord being executed carries just a few notes of that scale (let's say it's a triad Root - 3rd - 5th) and if you think Scales, you'll probably hit notes likes 9ths, 13ths, etc and eventually they won't sound good or will sound good. So if you think 'Chord Tones' (notes of the chord being played) you start by playing thoses notes (which will 'always' sound good) and then experiment with extentions like 11ths, 13ths, 9ths, 7ths ... and this is the base of what we call Chord Tone Soloing ... this is an opposite approach of Scale Soloing which is very Scalar by the way.

So my best bet is to start creating melodies from Chord Tones :-)

Think Chords, not Scales.
Last edited by sohdubom at Jun 9, 2010,
#8
Quote by sohdubom
If you think of music as a series of Chords which in fact it is indeed, Scales will carry too much info, eg 'notes' and although all the notes of the scale if played for the proper Key will be 'right' notes, some of them when played over a particular chord may not sound as good as some other notes. Why? Because the particular chord being executed carries just a few notes of that scale (let's say it's a triad Root - 3rd - 5th) and if you think Scales, you'll probably hit notes likes 9ths, 13ths, etc and eventually they won't sound good or will sound good. So if you think 'Chord Tones' (notes of the chord being played) you start by playing thoses notes (which will 'always' sound good) and then experiment with extentions like 11ths, 13ths, 9ths, 7ths ... and this is the base of what we call Chord Tone Soloing ... this is an opposite approach of Scale Soloing which is very Scalar by the way.

So my best bet is to start creating melodies from Chord Tones :-)

Think Chords, not Scales.


without realizing it was called something, this is what i've been doing so far. It is much easier than having to go through a whole scale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
Quote by sohdubom
If you think of music as a series of Chords which in fact it is indeed, Scales will carry too much info, eg 'notes' and although all the notes of the scale if played for the proper Key will be 'right' notes, some of them when played over a particular chord may not sound as good as some other notes. Why? Because the particular chord being executed carries just a few notes of that scale (let's say it's a triad Root - 3rd - 5th) and if you think Scales, you'll probably hit notes likes 9ths, 13ths, etc and eventually they won't sound good or will sound good. So if you think 'Chord Tones' (notes of the chord being played) you start by playing thoses notes (which will 'always' sound good) and then experiment with extentions like 11ths, 13ths, 9ths, 7ths ... and this is the base of what we call Chord Tone Soloing ... this is an opposite approach of Scale Soloing which is very Scalar by the way.

So my best bet is to start creating melodies from Chord Tones :-)

Think Chords, not Scales.


I've doing pretty much the complete opposite, but I'll have to try that out, sounds like it could work well. What I've been doing is mainly using scales to find the chords, not chords to find the scales.

Personally I don't think either way would work better than the other, it just depends on the person.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#12
It's a bit hard to describe "how" to create melodies. You could say "use the scales" or "refer to chord tones", but in the end it's about personal creativity. All we can give is guidelines. Just try different things out until you get there.

I'll just put two ways I try;

1. Sing a melody that is in your head. Record it. Learn it on guitar. Apply to music. It's integral that you record it before trying to learn it on guitar, when you are beginning to learn how to do this, as the sound of the guitar and trial/error will inevitably make you forget the original melody that was in your head.

2. Have a recording of the chords. Play again and again while doing things on the guitar over it. Slowly you'll go "hey, this part sounds good here" and it'll slowly fill out. This is more useful for writing instrumentals and writing solos than vocal melodies I find.

But everyone has their own way of figuring it out. Eventually you'll learn how to integrate the chord tones approach into your soloing so it's not regarded as a separate technique to your scales approach.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
Quote by Slapp62
So heres my deal. I like writing songs, but I have trouble utilizing scales. I have to look all over the fretboard to find the notes I can use then have to try and remember them to use with other notes. Whats the best way to use scales in writing music?? Is it patterns? cause thats what it seems like to me.


How would you teach someone that knows their ABC's to write a New York Times best selling novel?

You can't. You have to do it yourself, find your own voice. Scales are like words, but its up to you where and how you use them that makes you a communicator. The best way to use scales in music is to forge your own musical voice with them.

Best,

Sean