#1
hey guys i've been doing this interval ear trainer and i'm at the point where i recognize the intervals and i was wondering what to do now? like where to go from this point?

also, what was the reason to do this?
i mean, i assume it's when single notes are being played and it will help me be able to tell what note comes next, right?

oh, and i was using this site but it got me wondering something, am i supposed to do it on piano? if you try it the notes are played on a piano but i am learning this for guitar.

http://classic.musictheory.net/90
#2
Quote by schism8
hey guys i've been doing this interval ear trainer and i'm at the point where i recognize the intervals and i was wondering what to do now? like where to go from this point?

also, what was the reason to do this?
i mean, i assume it's when single notes are being played and it will help me be able to tell what note comes next, right?

oh, and i was using this site but it got me wondering something, am i supposed to do it on piano? if you try it the notes are played on a piano but i am learning this for guitar.

http://classic.musictheory.net/90


First paragraph: Recognizing chord qualities. Start with just triads: Major, Minor, Diminished. And then go on to 7th chords: Major, Minor, Fully/Half Diminished, Dominant.

Second: Yes and no. It will DEFINITELY be able to help you with hearing what note comes next (like for improv), but it's at its best when you use it in composing/learning songs by ear. It'll help you with QUICKLY finding what chords they are using/you want to use and it'll help you be able to get what ideas are in your head quickly to your instrument.

Third: The intervals are the same for every instrument (in our 12-TET system). You'll just have to learn the shapes for them on guitar.
#3
I'm pretty sure that learning intervals helps you learn relative pitch, which is when you use the key or previous note to recognize the next.

As opposed to perfect pitch which is just recognizing the note when it's played. This takes years of training for most people.


Also, guitar and piano are in the same key so it doesn't really matter.
#4
the fact that it's used on a piano does not matter whatsoever. I think the best next step would be connecting the intervals to your guitarplaying
so you know what to do when someone says ''play a 5th''.
if you master both these things it will make improvising from the heart alot easier.
#5
Quote by Tedward
As opposed to perfect pitch which is just recognizing the note when it's played. This takes years of training for most people.


if by "takes years of training" you mean "is impossible", then yes.

Quote by Tedward
Also, guitar and piano are in the same key so it doesn't really matter.


congratulations, you've given me an outlet to test my new invention: the shrugstack.



seriously, i have no idea what that means.

i second everything d-fifth said. and how.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Quote by DiminishedFifth
First paragraph: Recognizing chord qualities. Start with just triads: Major, Minor, Diminished. And then go on to 7th chords: Major, Minor, Fully/Half Diminished, Dominant.

Second: Yes and no. It will DEFINITELY be able to help you with hearing what note comes next (like for improv), but it's at its best when you use it in composing/learning songs by ear. It'll help you with QUICKLY finding what chords they are using/you want to use and it'll help you be able to get what ideas are in your head quickly to your instrument.

Third: The intervals are the same for every instrument (in our 12-TET system). You'll just have to learn the shapes for them on guitar.


can you explain a little bit more on recognizing? im not quite sure i understand.

that's what i meant, i just worded it stupid. lol
but with chords? i assume you mean it'll help with chords as i progress? because i don't see how what i am doing (just learn the difference in pitch when played separately) with help with chords?

ah, alright.

@tedward ah, ok.
thanks.

@johnnysolo i already know intervals and when some one tells me to play that i could. currently, i just wanna learn how to play guitar by ear, i know basic theory and what not.
#7
Quote by schism8
that's what i meant, i just worded it stupid. lol
but with chords? i assume you mean it'll help with chords as i progress? because i don't see how what i am doing (just learn the difference in pitch when played separately) with help with chords?


do you know what voiceleading is?

if not, i advise you to look into it. once you start to get it, the benefits of a good ear will become increasingly clear.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
do you know what voiceleading is?

if not, i advise you to look into it. once you start to get it, the benefits of a good ear will become increasingly clear.

i just read it's wikipedia and im confused. how would it help the ear?
#9
Quote by schism8
can you explain a little bit more on recognizing? im not quite sure i understand.

that's what i meant, i just worded it stupid. lol
but with chords? i assume you mean it'll help with chords as i progress? because i don't see how what i am doing (just learn the difference in pitch when played separately) with help with chords?

ah, alright.

I'm using you Griff! Go here and click "Suspensions Example 3" (cause it's the easiest to hear). Can you tell me whether the first chord is major, minor or diminished? Could you tell me whether the key is major/minor? Could you tell me whether or not the cadence is a Perfect Authentic, Imperfect Authentic, Plagal, Deceptive, Half, or a Phrygian-Half? Cause I can answer all of these based on one listening of it (I've never seen the sheet music, and I doubt I ever will).

This is what I mean by recognizing. Ear training will help with ALL of this.

Now can I write it down? Not unless I was given a key sig and a starting note. My ear isn't THAT good (I think only darren's ear is that good haha). You would need Perfect Pitch for that.
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
if by "takes years of training" you mean "is impossible", then yes.


congratulations, you've given me an outlet to test my new invention: the shrugstack.



seriously, i have no idea what that means.

i second everything d-fifth said. and how.



The piano player in my band took lessons for years and now he can recognize a note just by hearing it. Which is called perfect pitch. It might not be possible for some people to learn it, for others it's just really hard.


And when I said same key, I meant that neither guitar, nor piano, are transposing instruments.
#11
Quote by Tedward
The piano player in my band took lessons for years and now he can recognize a note just by hearing it. Which is called perfect pitch. It might not be possible for some people to learn it, for others it's just really hard.


And when I said same key, I meant that neither guitar, nor piano, are transposing instruments.

Actually, the guitar is a transposing instrument. One whole octave down.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#12
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I'm using you Griff! Go here and click "Suspensions Example 3" (cause it's the easiest to hear). Can you tell me whether the first chord is major, minor or diminished? Could you tell me whether the key is major/minor? Could you tell me whether or not the cadence is a Perfect Authentic, Imperfect Authentic, Plagal, Deceptive, Half, or a Phrygian-Half? Cause I can answer all of these based on one listening of it (I've never seen the sheet music, and I doubt I ever will).

This is what I mean by recognizing. Ear training will help with ALL of this.

Now can I write it down? Not unless I was given a key sig and a starting note. My ear isn't THAT good (I think only darren's ear is that good haha). You would need Perfect Pitch for that.


i guess it was major? anyways, i have no idea what any of those bolded words mean, i assume i have a long way to go?