#1
in a modern popular music context at what point do your high and low notes stop counting as part of your range?

Like the minute I wake up I can belt out a C5 (C above middle C) and that notes quite easy to hit cleanly now so that's definitely part of my range. Thing is I've got a C#5 later in the day that I can sustain fairly well and in a clean tone, and sometimes I can touch on the D5 above that but it's very hard to sustain without breaking into a scream.

So when you guys are talking about vocal range, do you just mean any note you can hit without falsetto or vocal fry, or just the notes that you can hit with ease and sustain them without a problem?
#2
I pretty much mean any note I can hit without falsetto or vocal fry, but that might not be technically correct. I really don't know a whole lot about singing.
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Out loud, or in your head, it's up to you.
#3
Quote by Cheeseman07
in a modern popular music context at what point do your high and low notes stop counting as part of your range?

Like the minute I wake up I can belt out a C5 (C above middle C) and that notes quite easy to hit cleanly now so that's definitely part of my range. Thing is I've got a C#5 later in the day that I can sustain fairly well and in a clean tone, and sometimes I can touch on the D5 above that but it's very hard to sustain without breaking into a scream.

So when you guys are talking about vocal range, do you just mean any note you can hit without falsetto or vocal fry, or just the notes that you can hit with ease and sustain them without a problem?


Oh man, you just opened up a huge can of worms.

This is entirely a judgment call. I would consider it any note you can hit convincingly (admittedly subjective), whereas many people consider it to be only chest voice.

Truth be told, I don't really care. When it comes down to it, a good singer is a good singer. If someone tells me they have a four octave range, and one octave is a flappy vocal fry, and another octave and a half is a weak, airy falsetto, they can have the four octave label, but it doesn't change the fact that they're not a particularly accomplished singer.
#4
Yeah I should've been clearer, I know the whole what counts as range just starts a shitstorm wherever you are. I know there's gonna be a lot of debate there so I'm just asking what notes you count when just talking about "full voice" or chest voice, heavy mix, belted notes, whatever. I can't figure out how to pass that last bridge yet so none of my high notes would be called falsetto even by very traditional operatic teachers.

When talking about that chest heavy vocal co-ordination that most folks sing in, which notes should I count as being in my range?

and yeah I absolutely agree with that last part, I usually prefer a nice sounding belted high A to even the best heavy metal vocalist singing a thin sounding A above that. all about which notes sound best in your range rather than how high you can go.
#5
Quote by Cheeseman07
Yeah I should've been clearer, I know the whole what counts as range just starts a shitstorm wherever you are. I know there's gonna be a lot of debate there so I'm just asking what notes you count when just talking about "full voice" or chest voice, heavy mix, belted notes, whatever. I can't figure out how to pass that last bridge yet so none of my high notes would be called falsetto even by very traditional operatic teachers.

When talking about that chest heavy vocal co-ordination that most folks sing in, which notes should I count as being in my range?

and yeah I absolutely agree with that last part, I usually prefer a nice sounding belted high A to even the best heavy metal vocalist singing a thin sounding A above that. all about which notes sound best in your range rather than how high you can go.


Well, with the example you used (C# or D), those notes should really be quite head-heavy, even if they sound chesty. Otherwise, you'll never pass that second bridge. For me, unless I'm pulling chest for effect, it really stops being chest heavy above the E below high C (the high E on guitar). The thing is, since there's still some chest in the sound, as well as some pharyngeal narrowing, it sounds way more chesty than it really is. That's the trick. When you hear a singer like Bruce Dickinson, Chris Cornell, or David Lee Roth that have really thick upper-middle ranges, they're usually using a lot more head voice than you probably think.