#1
Hi guys, im getting pretty bad feedback from my amp when im on distorted, so im thinking about getting a noise gate. the only other pedal i have is a cry baby so i will be going either directly from the noise gate to the guitar or through the crybaby.

So im looking for suggestions and if i would need to set it up differently. Thanks!

EDIT: Id like to keep it under 125ish...i would be going used. But i really dont want to spend that much if i dont have to.
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Last edited by diceksox1809 at Jun 10, 2010,
#2
decimator /thread
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#4
If you're using the gain on your amp and you don't have an effects loop the noise gate isn't going to do much.
#5
Use your 2 and 4 positions on your strat to negate the buzz a little?
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#6
Quote by Chikao42
Use your 2 and 4 positions on your strat to negate the buzz a little?

Then he doesn't get the single coil "bite".
Solutions:
1) If your amp has an effects loop, buy a noise gate and plug it in there.
2) Turn down the gain.
3) Go for a more humbucker like tone and use positions 2 and 4 on your strat.
#7
Quote by salgala2000
Then he doesn't get the single coil "bite".
...
3) Go for a more humbucker like tone and use positions 2 and 4 on your strat.



the 2 and 4 positions don't sound like a humbucker on my strat..?
#8
High gain often requires a noise gate so why is everyone saying "turn down the gain" and all this other stuff before finding out more about his settings and or issue? Without knowing what your exact settings are here are some general comments:

First of all, if you ran a noise gate like an ISP Decimator or Boss NS-2 then you'd put it in the front of your amp, not the loop (unless you run the X pattern to reduce the hiss as well on the NS2 or Decimator G-string model).

Second, your amp should have an on-board noise gate. This is straight from your amps manual:


Adjusting the noise reduction
Here’s how to adjust the way in which noise is suppressed.
NOTE: Noise reduction is specified individually for each program. In Preset mode
or Channel Select mode, the noise reduction setting will be lost if you switch to
a different program or to Manual mode or turn off the power before saving.
1. Press the [BYPASS] switch to make the BYPASS LED light.
2. While holding down the [TAP] switch, turn the [EDIT] knob to adjust the sensitivity
of the noise reduction. Turning the knob toward the right will produce stronger noise
reduction. If the knob is turned all the way to the left, noise reduction will be off and
will have no effect.
NOTE: Depending on the guitar you’re using, raising the noise reduction too
high may cause notes to be cut off.
3. If you want to use an effect, press the [BYPASS] switch to make the BYPASS LED go dark.


So you should have no need to purchase a noise gate unless you are using crap loads of gain and your built in noise gate can't handle it at high volumes.
Last edited by AkiraSpectrum at Jun 10, 2010,
#10
Quote by AkiraSpectrum
First of all, if you ran a noise gate like an ISP Decimator or Boss NS-2 then you'd put it in the front of your amp, not the loop (unless you run the X pattern to reduce the hiss as well on the NS2 or Decimator G-string model). .

This is false. If you are using a dirt box for your distortion, then yes, you'd run the gait in FRONT of the amp. But if you're using your amp's onboard distortion, than putting the gait in front of the amp's input would do nothing but kill your sustain. Think about it. An amp's distortion comes from the amp (I know. Stupid comment. Just bear with me for a second), and therefore a gait before the amp would not be cutting down on noise from its source, i.e. the preamp stage. Putting it in the loop places the gait between the pre and power amp sections, that is, after the distortion in your amp.
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#11
Quote by kumamilesbear
This is false. If you are using a dirt box for your distortion, then yes, you'd run the gait in FRONT of the amp. But if you're using your amp's onboard distortion, than putting the gait in front of the amp's input would do nothing but kill your sustain. Think about it. An amp's distortion comes from the amp (I know. Stupid comment. Just bear with me for a second), and therefore a gait before the amp would not be cutting down on noise from its source, i.e. the preamp stage. Putting it in the loop places the gait between the pre and power amp sections, that is, after the distortion in your amp.



I don't agree, at least not completely. From my experience anyways a gate in the loop does not stop the 'hum'. I've tried it in my 5150 and I still get the unwanted 'hum' (i believe termed 60 cycle hum?). Just because the gate is in the effects loop doesn't mean it doesn't cut your tone either, it does cut tone there as well.


For the TS however he should not need a gate because as I said above he has one built into his modelling amp already.
#12
Quote by AkiraSpectrum
I don't agree, at least not completely. From my experience anyways a gate in the loop does not stop the 'hum'. I've tried it in my 5150 and I still get the unwanted 'hum' (i believe termed 60 cycle hum?). Just because the gate is in the effects loop doesn't mean it doesn't cut your tone either, it does cut tone there as well.


For the TS however he should not need a gate because as I said above he has one built into his modelling amp already.

Hmm. I've had a much different experience :/
But I wasn't saying that you wouldn't experience tone suckage when it's in the loop, just that it would be all you got if it was in front of the amp. But that's just my personal experience and that of a lot of my friends.
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#13
Quote by AcousticMirror
I've never used a noise gate?
learn to mute?

You've also been using high end and boutique amps. A lot of high gain amps get noise fairly easily if they're not laid out or designed properly. I got heaps of noise with my old Marshall TSL, but with the Mark IV, I use more gain but its far quieter because more care went into the layout and design of the amp. Noise gates are always useful anyway, even if you dont get a lot of noise, they still give you a tighter sound if you're playing fast riffs with staccato.
#14
Quote by AcousticMirror
I've never used a noise gate?
learn to mute?

Yeah, when you start playing some gigs with high gain amps, you'll see.
#15
as said above, VT50 has a built-in noise gate.


Don't feel bad though, I didn't realize it for the longest time either on mine.


Also, can someone explain the X-pattern for me?

I've never thought about noisegates that way (being in front), but I guess if you have a huge pedalboard it could reduce 60-cycle hum and interference from the other pedals.
#16
^Noise gates in front stop any signal when your guitar signal falls below the threshold you set (same effect as turning the volume all the way down, but almost instant).
When you use the X pattern you get this plus the gating after the preamp, so it stops more noise.
#17
OK ya that makes sense.


But when people say X-pattern, do they have some complicated cable set up running from FX loop to board and back or something like that?
#18
I guess. You can just sit it on the amp and leave it on all the time, although its probably not ideal.
#19
I think the X-pattern goes something like this, this is what Zoltan Bathory from Five Finger Death Punch does, but he has a two channel MXR smart gate.
1-guitar into noise gate (channel one) input
2-noise gate (channel one) output into amp input
3-amp effect loop send into noise gate (channel two) input
4-noise gate (channel two) output back into the effect loop return

I'm not totally sure if it's the same thing but this looks like it would give you more control to stop noise without killing your tone.
#20
After experimenting with a LOT of different noise gates (from simple cheap ones on mfx units, to $400+ units like the ISP Decimator pro rack G) I have found a couple simple things.

1) a noise gate in front of the amp stops only noise from the guitar, and pedals. Pre-amp noise is not effected.
2) A gate in the loop stops EVERYTHING (if the loop is a series loop and functioning properly) before the power section (you might still get just a very small amount of noise from the power section....most amps gated at the loop are DEAD quiet...like they weren't even turned on.
3) Gating the FX loop has some limitations. If you gate it to cut the noise with your pedal/s on and running your high gain channel...when you switch those off and use your clean settings, most often your gate will be cutting into your signal, and cutting it off prematurely.
4) Gating the loop often requires adjustment every time you change volume settings (much the same as #3...gating for loud kills quiet, gating for quiet doesn't stop noise when loud)

Ideally, you should gate BOTH the front AND the loop. Gate the loop enough to kill noise when the guitar volume is off and your at your highest gain channel/pedals. gating JUST the noise from the amp will not require much gating at all. Next Gate the guitar so that you can JUST take your hands off the guitar without breaking the gate...you can go less...where you HAVE to hold the strings to activate the gate....but with a GOOD gate, it isn't necessary.
Now, you can switch from lead to clean without messing with either gate. Your lead channel will be quiet, your clean channel wont get cut off, and you wont mess with your tone.

One thing the rack units do (Rocktron Hush, ISP pro rack) is they have noise reducing circuits to reduce the noise when the gate is open...meaning you can turn the loop gate down even further. Also, this means you won't have the noise mixed in with your tone...win/win!

On a limitless budget, I would suggest the ISP pro rack G. It has the noise suppression, a gate for in front of the amp, and a gate for the loop all in one unit. The first gate tells the loop gate when to shut down...works with no adjustment no matter the channel or volume level. Does NOT work on ALL amps equally! I had a Genz BEnz El Diablo...the loop signal was too hot for the ISP ended up cross talking from the loop to the amp input...NOT good!!!

The set up I am running now is an ISP decimator in the front of the amp, and a Rocktron Hush Super C in the loop. The Rocktron suppresses the noise, and gates the loop....I run the gate VERY low here, again, ONLY enough to kill the signal when the guitar is turned off. The ISP in front of the amp effectively turns the guitar off.
Setting it up as described, I can have my lead channel running all the agin I want (and 6262s come will LOAD of gain) and switch over to the clean channel, and still have singing sustain. Final piece in the noise killing puzzle...a Furman power supply to filter out noise from power lines (AMAZING when you take it somewhere with really noisy power)

Of course, if you like to dial your gain with the guitar volume knob, you'll need to set the front gate VERY light.

The ISP Decimator "G string" as well as the Boss and any other gate that can run in an X pattern, can work very well, but you miss out on the noise suppression...ALL you get is gate. And depending on what you want before or after the gate, you may need to run a LOT more cable. If you have a G string on your pedal board, your gonna need 3 times the cable compared to not running a loop (from pedal to amp+loop to pedal+pedal to loop) if you put everything on 25' cables, and add 1 more so you can walk away from the pedal board, your looking at 100' of cable.

For the original poster (seems you have a gate in the amp) you might want to try a gate in front of the amp, and use the built in gate to kill any pre-amp noise from your high gain channel. I HIGHLY recommend the ISP decimator. in my trials, it has the fastest response for staccato riffing, and will hold open the best for those long singing sustain notes...also, it is virtually transparent....on or off, your tone stays the same!

Best of luck!!!

Quote by kumamilesbear
... But if you're using your amp's onboard distortion, than putting the gait in front of the amp's input would do nothing but kill your sustain. ...



Actually, the 60hz hum (not this high frequency hiss) generally comes from the front of the amp (i.e. the guitar, cables). Single coil pick-ups...flourecent lights...these are stopped with a gate on the front.
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Last edited by Vinson at Jun 11, 2010,
#22
Quote by GibsonnFender
Volume pedal?


After the gate ;-)
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