#1
Hi guys, hate to trouble you again, but I'm in another little dilemma. I'm FINALLY set on a new guitar now(getting a Warmoth V2 built), but since it comes sans pickups I'm going to need a little advice again. I'm getting it set up with two humbuckers, and I want something good for playing a decent range of stuff, including Pantera, Judas Priest, Van Halen, Led Zeppelin, Megadeth and Jag Panzer. I want:

Good cleans(or, at least somewhat good cleans. Passable for Led Zeppelin would be nice)
Good with high gain(AKA not muddy)
Not active(I don't really like the tones I've heard from them)
Under $100 CDN a pickup, preferably(I can probably stretch a little, but I'm 15 and unemployed, so I'm a little tight on cash)

Some pickups I've had vague interest in(albeit I've never played on them, I'm lefty and in Newfoundland, Canada there's about 20 lefty guitars for sale total, msot of them being Epiphones, single-coils or Ibanez GRGs):

DiMarzio D-Activators for both positions
DiMarzio Super 3 for bridge
Bill Lawrence XL500(not sure about the price of these) for bridge
DiMarzio Air Classic for neck

Sorry if I'm being really picky. I play through a Randall RX75RG2 75-watt combo and the body's going to be basswood if that helps any. Any other suggestions would be very much appreciated!
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#2
what wood are you making the V2 out of? i love the super distortion in mahogany or swamp ash. great for everything from metal to hair metal to classic rock. sounds decent clean too (especially in mahogany).
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip
#3
It's gonna be basswood. =P And which Super Disto? DiMarzio makes one and Seymour Duncan makes one. o_o
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#4
Definitely need to know the wood that will be used in the Warmoth parts. Would also help to know what other hardware and controls you're having the parts routed for too.

Edit: okay, basswood body. What about the neck? With bolt-on guitars, more tone comes from the neck and fretboard woods really.
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#5
The neck's gonna be all-maple. =P
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#6
Right. And the hardware?

To save time, copy & pasting the spec would really help.
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#7
i thought SD's was just called the "Distortion." either way, dimarzio makes the Super Distortion. basswood is a strange wood. can be great for some pickups or awful for others. at least i've found with my RGs i've had. i still like the super distortion though. with a good neck pickup i think you'll get everything you could want out of it. and i recommend an air norton neck. had one in my peavey wolfgang and it was easily the best neck pickup i've ever used with distortion. sounded awesome clean too. the wolfgang was a hardtail model, but they're also made out of basswood
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

"Well good God damn and other such phrases, I haven't heard a beat like this in ages!"
-Dan Le Sac Vs The Scroobius Pip
#8
K...

Body:
Model: Standard V2
Scale: 25-1/2 in.
Orientation: Left handed
Wood:
•Core: Basswood
Control Cavity: Rear Rout
Pickup Rout: Humbucker (Neck) - None (Middle) - Humbucker (Brdg)
Control Rout:
•Toggle (V)
•Volume 1 (V)
•Volume 2 (V)
•Tone (V)
Bridge Type: Hardtail
Bridge Rout: TOM/STP, Angled Pocket
Jack Rout: 7/8" (22.23mm) Side Jack Hole
Neck Pocket: Strat® Shape
Mounting Holes: Standard 4 Bolt

Neck:
Style: Jackson
Construction: Warmoth Pro Angled
Scale: 25-1/2 in.
Neck Wood:
Shaft Wood: Maple
•Fingerboard Wood: Maple
Orientation: Left Handed
Nut Width: 1 11/16"
Back Shape: Standard thin
Radius: 10-16" compound
# of Frets: 22
Fret Size: 6150
Tuner Ream: Gotoh/Grover (13/32", 11/32")
Inlays: Black Sharkfin
Pre-Cut Installed String Nut: GraphTech Black TUSQ XL
Mounting Holes: Standard 4 Bolt
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#9
Quote by LifeIsABullet16
i thought SD's was just called the "Distortion." either way, dimarzio makes the Super Distortion. basswood is a strange wood. can be great for some pickups or awful for others. at least i've found with my RGs i've had. i still like the super distortion though. with a good neck pickup i think you'll get everything you could want out of it. and i recommend an air norton neck. had one in my peavey wolfgang and it was easily the best neck pickup i've ever used with distortion. sounded awesome clean too. the wolfgang was a hardtail model, but they're also made out of basswood

Ah, k. The DiMarzio Super Disto will definitely be taken into consideration then. =P Thanks!
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#10
I cant recommend the super3 enough, its an awesome pickup for mid to high gain stuff. Be warned though its rather hard to get nice cleans from it as it really pushes tubes into break up.

It has lots of mids so it cuts like a knife but retains a big bottom end and not too spikey highs it was designed for getting loads of clarity out of high gain amps and does the job admirably.
ESP M-1 - Dimarzio Super3
Ibanez RG3270 ToneZone/Blue Velvet/Paf Pro
Ibanez RG1527
PRS CE22
Mercer Blackmachine Replica

Diezel Herbert
Diezel Einstein Combo
TC GMajor

Gain Wh0re and Diezel Mafioso
#11
Quote by halikus
I cant recommend the super3 enough, its an awesome pickup for mid to high gain stuff. Be warned though its rather hard to get nice cleans from it as it really pushes tubes into break up.

It has lots of mids so it cuts like a knife but retains a big bottom end and not too spikey highs it was designed for getting loads of clarity out of high gain amps and does the job admirably.

Oh. Well, I intend on using the bridge for all my gainy stuff, then the neck for my cleans, so it's all good. Thanks!
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#12
Sounds like a fairly balanced, if slightly dark-toned build.

For the bridge, a DiMarzio Steve's Special will balance out the tone almost completely, and after all most ''classic'' tones do come from balanced pickups, with the amp doing most of the work. The Crunch Lab will emphasis the mids-heavy tone of the basswood while balancing out the bolt-on construction and all-maple neck, for a slightly thickened tone. A Breed will really thicken it up for some properly old school tones. A Seymour Duncan Custom will really bring out the lower-mids and treble detail, greatly balancing the basswood body without the bass getting muddy, although it could turn out a little bit too harsh - you would probably want to use a mixture of one 500k pot and one 250k pot for the controls to balance that. A Custom Five will be a smoother version of the Custom, it certainly won't have that brittle high-end but it may get a little muddier in the bass if you're not careful. The Alternative 8 would give you every advantage - powerful but clear bass, cutting treble without being too harsh and strong middle frequencies for that thick, classic tone - but it is so powerful that you would have to be careful with your amp's EQ or it could be hard to ever get a crisp clean tone out of it, it really can be too much for some amps.

For the neck, a DiMarzio Air Classic would provide an even, balanced tone, although it could come across a little ''boring'', I have not found its response to be particularly good. A Breed will again give you a really thick, vintage tone, although the bass could get a little on the muddy side. A Seymour Duncan '59 will balance the body and add a little liveliness to the treble detail but again, bass could get muddy. An SD Original Parallel Axis will give you much better precision and response through the lower frequencies, but like the SD Custom it would really need a mixture of 500k and 250 pots to take the edge off of its treble detail, to keep it within classic territory. Any good, balanced PAF copy with an Alnico IV magnet (Tonerider make the best that I've found so far, despite them being very cheap) would focus the mid-spike that basswood tends to have, round off the increased treble that bolt-on necks tend to have and yet would keep the bass fairly clear; like the Air Classic though, it wouldn't be the most exciting tone in the world, just balanced and straight-forward classic.



Those would be my picks anyway, for a build like that. I would probably be more inclined to stick with the Duncans over the DiMarzis, I personally find SDs to be better for more classic tones and DiMarzio to be better for more modern tones. If I was building this guitar, I would probably pick out the Alternative 8 for the bridge and a Tonerider Alnico IV Classic for the neck.
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#13
Quote by MrFlibble
Sounds like a fairly balanced, if slightly dark-toned build.

For the bridge, a DiMarzio Steve's Special will balance out the tone almost completely, and after all most ''classic'' tones do come from balanced pickups, with the amp doing most of the work. The Crunch Lab will emphasis the mids-heavy tone of the basswood while balancing out the bolt-on construction and all-maple neck, for a slightly thickened tone. A Breed will really thicken it up for some properly old school tones. A Seymour Duncan Custom will really bring out the lower-mids and treble detail, greatly balancing the basswood body without the bass getting muddy, although it could turn out a little bit too harsh - you would probably want to use a mixture of one 500k pot and one 250k pot for the controls to balance that. A Custom Five will be a smoother version of the Custom, it certainly won't have that brittle high-end but it may get a little muddier in the bass if you're not careful. The Alternative 8 would give you every advantage - powerful but clear bass, cutting treble without being too harsh and strong middle frequencies for that thick, classic tone - but it is so powerful that you would have to be careful with your amp's EQ or it could be hard to ever get a crisp clean tone out of it, it really can be too much for some amps.

For the neck, a DiMarzio Air Classic would provide an even, balanced tone, although it could come across a little ''boring'', I have not found its response to be particularly good. A Breed will again give you a really thick, vintage tone, although the bass could get a little on the muddy side. A Seymour Duncan '59 will balance the body and add a little liveliness to the treble detail but again, bass could get muddy. An SD Original Parallel Axis will give you much better precision and response through the lower frequencies, but like the SD Custom it would really need a mixture of 500k and 250 pots to take the edge off of its treble detail, to keep it within classic territory. Any good, balanced PAF copy with an Alnico IV magnet (Tonerider make the best that I've found so far, despite them being very cheap) would focus the mid-spike that basswood tends to have, round off the increased treble that bolt-on necks tend to have and yet would keep the bass fairly clear; like the Air Classic though, it wouldn't be the most exciting tone in the world, just balanced and straight-forward classic.



Those would be my picks anyway, for a build like that. I would probably be more inclined to stick with the Duncans over the DiMarzis, I personally find SDs to be better for more classic tones and DiMarzio to be better for more modern tones. If I was building this guitar, I would probably pick out the Alternative 8 for the bridge and a Tonerider Alnico IV Classic for the neck.

I've heard a lot of good things about the '59, and if Dimebag Darrell used his Dean From Hell(which had a '59 in the neck) for his cleans, I think I'd probably go with that for the neck, and the Steve's Special sounds to be good too. Hmm, decisions decisions. I'm thinking the DiMarzio Super 3 for the bridge and a '59 for the neck, any opinions on that? Once again, thanks a lot, guys, you're making a 15 year old wannabe guitar god/tech's day. =P
Quote by SlayingDragons
Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.